Letters


Dedication to Injured Soldiers

* In "Leading Our Wounded Warriors" ("Company Command," February), I was very happy to see that some of the leaders mentioned some of the lessons I've learned about our injured personnel in my civilian job as a firefighter in our nation's capital.

Some of our firefighters who were badly injured on the job last fall have had someone there for them and their families every day since. The chief himself spent the first night with them, and there was home-cooked food from one of the firehouses for every meal in the hospital-more than two months worth for the most seriously injured.

I believe so strongly in this kind of dedication to our injured comrades that when a friend of mine who is in the fire department wrote me from Iraq to say that one of his soldiers had been badly injured, I went to visit her several times to make sure that she was getting everything she needed and to let her know that he was still watching over her care. Having watched how bitter people can become when they feel abandoned by their leadership and how well they do when they feel like they're still a valued member of the team, I can say without reservation that this is a critical factor that allows people, and particularly soldiers, to go beyond the wildest expectations of their physicians in their recovery.

2ND LT. ANNE GUGLIK, MDARNG

Bowie, Md.

The Army Uniform

* When the January issue of ARMY Magazine arrived, as usual I first turned to "Front & Center" to see if there was an article by a former boss, Gen. Frederick J. Kroesen, U.S. Army retired. Then I turned to the "Letters" section. The two colonels were right on the mark in their letters regarding adaptive leadership and the reviews of Col. Cole C. Kingseed, U.S. Army retired. After I read CSM Lowell A. May's letter, I did not know whether to shout "Hallelujah!" and "Amen!"-or come to attention and salute-so I did both. In the late 1950s and the '60s, at Fort Benning, Ga., you couldn't wear fatigues off post; after 5 P.M., you couldn't wear them on post. Battle dress uniforms, Army combat uniforms, physical training uniforms and fatigues are for combat and "sweat" work. Dump the black beanie and keep the green Class A uniform with a sensible garrison or overseas cap.

CW4 A.P. (KELLY) SCHANZENBACH, AUS RET.

Lawrenceville, Ga.

Billy Mitchell

* The myth of the prophet scorned by his contemporaries is a powerful folk genre, but it is still surprising to see it perpetuated in ARMY Magazine. In a piece entitled "Sometimes a Court-Martial Isn't the Last Word" (February "Front & Center"), Richard Hart Sinnreich portrays William (Billy) Mitchell as the omniscient seer, the visionary who predicted with "astonishing prescience how the Japanese one day would attack Pearl Harbor and the Philippines. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Letters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.