Research Director's Report

By Rehwaldt, Peter W. | The Hymn, Winter 2008 | Go to article overview

Research Director's Report


Rehwaldt, Peter W., The Hymn


PETER W. REHWALDT

Some friends of mine and I once visited the Elizabeth Hubert Malott Japanese Garden outside Chicago. Our guide described not only the plants and ornamental features of each area, but also the idea of "borrowed view," whereby the designer of the garden takes into account what one sees beyond the immediate area in crafting a particular space. "Do you see how these two plants are placed, so that when you stand here, they serve to frame your view of that over there?" It was an epiphany moment, and I have often thought of the "borrowed view" in many other contexts since then. Such as worship.

At Hymn Society conferences and within the pages of this journal, we talk a lot about the words of hymns, the music of hymns, and the history of hymns-but the places in which we sing them do not often get so much attention. The windows, art, and architecture of our worship spaces are the "borrowed view" of hymn singing. Some settings shape the singing for good and others for ill, but all worship spaces deserves attention from those who plan worship.

In my first parish after graduating from seminary, I spent one Saturday each year with my confirmation students talking about worship spaces and how they shape the worship itself. We would gather in our sanctuary, and I'd ask them, "What symbols and art do you see in this space that adds to our worship? What do you see that perhaps gets in the way?" Generally, they wouldn't see much and would offer comments like "it's just our church. Pretty ordinary, really."

Then we'd go on a tour of area churches. We would visit places like a Roman Catholic cathedral, a Greek Orthodox parish, and the chapel of a community that specializes in modern liturgical art. In each place, our eyes would be opened to how the artists and architects were doing things that influences worship in each space.

At the end of the day, we had returned to the place we had started: our own sanctuary. "After what we've seen today, let's look around here again. What do you see here that adds to our worship, or that gets in the way?" This time, my questions usually unleashed a flood of responses. The way we viewed our own worship space changed drastically, once we'd had our eyes opened by other spaces. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Research Director's Report
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.