Women's Groups Are Booming

Aging Today, November/December 2007 | Go to article overview

Women's Groups Are Booming


With 4,000 Americans turning age 60 every day and more than 70 million expected to be 65-plus by 2020-the majority of them women-the need for support in people's postretirement years will continue to grow. In addition to The Transition Network, other organizations are ready to help women through midlife and their later years. Among them are:

WomanSage, a Southern Californiabased membership organization, was founded by nationally distributed columnist Jane Glenn Haas of the Orange County Register. Dedicated to education and empowerment, WomanSage fosters mentoring relationships among women at midlife. For women of all social and economic backgrounds, WomanSage currently has a total of nine chapters in. Arizona, California and Connecticut. The organization offers monthly salon meetings, an annual conference and special interest groups that organize social gatherings or provide information and support in such areas as financial management, transitions to retirement and starting a business at midlife. Visit the website at www.womansage.org.

Project Renewment brings together small, informal groups of career women in Southern California "to learn from one another as they create their future," states the forthcoming book Project Renewment: The First Retirement Model for Career Women (New York City: Scribner, spring 2008). The book was coauthored by the organization's founders, Bernice Bratter, former executive director of the Los Angeles Women's Foundation, and Helen Dennis, a nationally recognized specialist on aging, employment and retirement. …

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