Editorial

By Browne, Angela | Violence and Victims, January 1, 1986 | Go to article overview

Editorial


Browne, Angela, Violence and Victims


Violence and Victims was created to provide a structured forum for the growing literature on violence and violence-related victimization, to make it easier for professionals to stay informed on the latest in theoretical, practical, and empirical advances across different disciplines and specialties, and to encourage a more integrated approach to the study of victimization and assault. Volume 1 of Violence and Victims covered a wide range of topics: from analysis of risk markers in husband-towife violence, differences and similarities in evaluation of child maltreatment by hospital professionals, the outcome of court-mandated treatment programs for violent spouses, and therapists' duty to warn potential victims of violence; to the relationship between television watching and violent criminal behavior, correlations of gender, lifestyles, and victimization, subjective distress and violence during rape, and an analysis of poverty and homicide in Detroit.

Contributors have come from the areas of clinical and experimental psychology, sociology, criminal justice, law, medicine, and psychiatry. In addition, professionals from many fields have participated in the review and editorial process, adding their expertise, insight, and perspective.1 Under the guidance of Larry Baron, book reviews in Violence and Victims spanned the topics of sex and aggression, violence in the family, social policy and child abuse. Number 3 also introduced Brief Reports, an ongoing section by Pamela Casey that reviews court rulings and pending legislation of import to the field.

In the current issue, Richard Block and Wesley Skogan explore correlations between types of resistance offered by potential targets of predatory crime and the outcomes of these events. Based on data from the National Crime Survey, this report offers provocative insights into the relationship between forceful, nonforceful, and no resistance to an attempted predatory crime and outcomes of injury and loss. …

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