Cognitive Developmental Therapy with Children

By Friedberg, Robert D. | Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, January 1, 1998 | Go to article overview

Cognitive Developmental Therapy with Children


Friedberg, Robert D., Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy


Cognitive Developmental Therapy With Children Tammie Ronen. New York: John Wiley (www.wiley.com). 1997, 180 pp., $55.50 (hardcover).

Cognitive-behavior therapy with children is a growing clinical frontier. A crucial task for cognitive-behavioral researchers and clinicians is creating developmentally appropriate methods for working with children. Superimposing our adult templates for clinical work onto children risks adultomorphizing these youngsters. In order to maintain a developmentally sensitive approach to cognitive-behavioral therapy with children, a conceptually sound theory which integrates assessment and intervention is needed. Cognitive Developmental Therapy with Children by Tammie Ronen offers a promising approach.

In Cognitive Developmental Therapy with Children, Ronen proposes a comprehensive theory for understanding child behavior which seamlessly integrates assessment and treatment. She expertly uses Beck's cognitive therapy as a theoretical/clinical heuristic and then fluidly combines it with a developmental educational model as well as Rosenbaum's self-control model. Additionally, one of the more important goals in the book is the synthesis of scientific rigor, theoretical knowledge, clinical flexibility, and therapeutic artistry. Through this fruitful synthesis, Ronen attempts to engage children (and their therapists!) in cognitive-behavior therapy. Ronen is clearly trying to make cognitive therapy more accessible to youngsters. Indeed, she succeeds admirably in achieving all her stated goals in writing Cognitive Developmental Therapy with Children.

The book is divided into three cogent parts. The first section is entitled "Decision making in assessment for child psychotherapy." In this section, Ronen discusses the importance of diagnostic processes and the way diagnosis shapes treatment planning. Her integration of assessment procedures with intervention strategies is seamless. Ronen aptly embeds the diagnostic process in a developmental context. She also articulately explores the complicated issues inherent in child psychotherapy such as the rapid rate of developmental changes in childhood, developmental discontinuities, and the high rate of ostensibly spontaneous symptom remission. The decision-making guidelines that Ronen offers are clear and easy to follow. The case examples which accompany the guidelines are illustrative and nicely amplify her points.

In the chapter discussing ways to adapt cognitive therapy to children, Ronen compellingly writes, "I view behavioral and cognitive therapies not as techniques but as a way of life, as a theoretical approach, and as a way of looking at one's behavior and trying to change it." (p. 46). Ronen explicitly discusses the practice of cognitive therapy from both a content and process perspective. She thoughtfully presents direct and indirect approaches to cognitive therapy. Moreover, she includes intervention strategies which rely on verbal and nonverbal processes. Her work clearly transcends the traditional notions of cognitive-behavior therapy with children. Ronen nimbly stretches the theoretical boundaries without violating the fundamental assumptions of cognitive therapy. In this way, Ronen breaks new ground in the child psychotherapy literature and makes a convincing case for adopting a cognitive approach to treating childhood problems.

Part II of the book deals with developing a cognitive therapy approach with children. The cognitive content of common problems, recent advances in cognitivebehavioral therapy with children, and the rationale for using cognitive therapy with children are highlighted. Important issues such as obstacles to therapy, dropout rates, and generalization of treatment effects are addressed. Further, Ronen astutely notes that temporary regressions are the rules rather than the exceptions in childhood. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cognitive Developmental Therapy with Children
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.