Senior Residences: Designing Retirement Communities for the Future

By Stahr, Rebecca Asid | Care Management Journals, Spring 1999 | Go to article overview

Senior Residences: Designing Retirement Communities for the Future


Stahr, Rebecca Asid, Care Management Journals


SENIOR RESIDENCES: DESIGNING RETIREMENT COMMUNITIES FOR THE FUTURE John E. Harrigan, PhD, Jennifer M. Raiser, MBS, and Phillip H. Raiser, MSArch New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 326pp., $54.95.

As the elderly increase in number, so it seems does multitude of developers and care providers, for reasons of necessity and economic potential. As this demographic change takes place, will requirements of the aging individual be overlooked in the rush to respond to demand? John Harrigan, Phillip Raiser and Jennifer Raiser tackle these issues in their book: Senior Residences: Designing Retirement Communities for the Future.

Confirming that there are many unknowns that lie ahead for this industry, the authors share experiences and formulas that have worked in their collective practices. Two prototype facilities, in the eastern and western United States, are used throughout this book as examples of concepts and strategies proven to deliver the best services and profits over the test of time. This comparison offers knowledge through which others might learn solutions to design problems in their facilities.

Increasingly, as many new facilities develop, solid survival instructions from the experience of others who have already paid their dues over the last decade of growth, in terms of time, cost, and winning community support, are a most efficient and secure approach for would be-developers. Issues are faced forthcomingly: How can care level and quality be balanced? How can a standard be maintained between cost and delivery of services? The underlying message is that profit and service can be joint tenets of aging facility development.

The authors argue that to protect the interest of developers and those they seek to serve, the Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC) is the best current resource. CCRCs meet the needs of all the players and often resolve economic, social, psychological and biological issues. The purpose of this book is to convince the readers that a CCRC is the answer to housing for our future aging population. It is common wisdom that time and money will solve all problems and create most opportunities. The authors apply this truism to housing for aging persons through CCRCs, where residents purchase and maintain applicable ownership rights. A CCRC can present a winwin proposition for all. Considering the developer, it creates guaranteed cash flow. For potential resident/ owners, it delivers the "cure" from point-of-purchase to the grave, with all needs met in-between. The authors propose an Executive Strategy for their discussion of CCRCs. This book delves into this strategy by evaluating Critical Success Factors, Standards of Performance, and Strategic Research.

RESIDENCES

The purpose of the strategy is to provide an interdisciplinary approach from all those involved in the design/build process in order to create a fulfilling business enterprise through proven residence and community acceptance. The theory is that with "discovery, clarification and verification by means of an inclusive process of debate and research, an Executive Strategy is the means for setting the conditions of success." For those who have been involved in this Design/Build Process, we know that the considerations for these projects can be staggering. With some organized standard of measure, less time is needed for agreeing what should be agreed to. …

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