SAME SEX: Rights to Get Married

By Mello, Luiz; Uziel, Anna Paula et al. | Americas Quarterly, Spring 2008 | Go to article overview

SAME SEX: Rights to Get Married


Mello, Luiz, Uziel, Anna Paula, Grossi, Miriam, Americas Quarterly


"To marry or not to marry?" For Latin America's gays and lesbians this is not the existential dilemma that it is for most heterosexual couples. It is the object of an intense political struggle waged country by country. With some notable exceptions, same-sex couples across the region cannot enjoy conjugal or parental rights.

At the same time, homosexuality is not illegal in any country in Latin America except Guyana. In Cuba, the legal status of lesbians and gays is somewhat ambiguous. This situates the region somewhere in the middle ground of global attitudes-more liberal than Africa and Asia, but much less tolerant than Europe. But for those facing discrimination, that is small comfort.

Some of the region's most enlightened laws for lesbians and gays have been passed in Uruguay, Argentina and Mexico. The Civil Union Law 1004 passed by the city of Buenos Aires in December 2002 guarantees all couples, regardless of gender or sexual orientation, the right to register their unions with the Public Registry for Civil Unions. To qualify, applicants must prove that they are a resident of Buenos Aires and have been involved in a stable and public relationship for at least two years, or they must have children together. Farther south, authorities in the Patagonian province of Rio Negro extended in April 2003 the same rights and obligations to same-sex couples already enjoyed by heterosexual couples.

The Cohabitation Law of Mexico City, approved in November 2006, grants same-sex couples marital rights identical to those established for common-law relationships between men and women. The decree specifically includes pension, inheritance and guardianship rights. In the Mexican state of Coahuila, Decree 209, dated January 2007, states that adults of the same or different sexes are recognized as "civil companions" and a family entity. The decree grants inheritance and alimony rights, among others, but prohibits adoptions.

BREAKING NEW GROUND

In Uruguay, a law signed by President Tabaré Vásquez in December 2007 grants certain legal rights to all cohabiting couples living together for at least five years. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

SAME SEX: Rights to Get Married
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.