At the Museum


AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

www.amnh.org

EXHIBITIONS LAST CHANCE!

Water: H2O = Life

Through May 26, 2008

Live animals, hands-on exhibits, and stunning dioramas invite the whole family to explore the beauty and essential nature of water and reveal one of the most pressing challenges of the 21st century: humanity's sustainable management and use of this life-giving, but finite, resource.

Water. H2O = Life is organized by the American Museum of Natural History, New York (www.amnh.org), and the Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul (www.smm.org), in collaboration with Great Lakes Science Center, Cleveland; The Field Museum, Chicago; lnstituton Sangari, SaO Paulo, Brazil; National Museum of Australia, Canberra; Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto; San Diego Natural History Museum; and Singapore Science Centre with PUB Singapore. The American Museum of Natural History gratefully acknowledges the Tamarind Foundation for its leadership support of Water: H2O = Life, and the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future for its assistance.

Exclusive corporate sponsor for Water: H2O - Life is jPMorgan. Water: H2O = Life is supported by a generous grant from the National Science Foundation.

The Museum extends its gratitude to the Panta Rhea Foundation, Park Foundation, and Wege Foundation for their support of the exhibition's educational programming and materials.

MST CHANCE!

The Butterfly Conservatory

Through May 26, 2008

Mingle with up to 500 live, free-flying tropical butterflies, and learn about the butterfly life cycle, defense mechanisms, evolution, and conservation.

LAST CHANCE!

Undersea Oasis: Coral Reef Communities

Through May 26, 2008

Brilliant color photographs capture the dazzling invertebrate life that flourishes on coral reefs.

Saturn: Images from the Cassini-Huygens Mission

Through March 29, 2009

This stunning exhibition reveals details of Saturn's rings, moons, and atmosphere with images sent over half a billion miles by the Cassini spacecraft. Pictures from the largest moon, Titan, are displayed alongside images of the giant geyser discovered on the smaller moon Enceladus.

The presentation of both Undersea Oasis and Saturn at the American Museum of Natural History is made possible by the generosity of the Arthur Ross Foundation. The support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for Saturn is appreciated.

Unknown Audubons: Mammals of North America

Through August 2008

The stately Audubon Gallery showcases gorgeously detailed depictions of North American mammals by John James Audubon, best known for his bird paintings.

Major funding for this exhibition has been provided by the Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Endowment Fund.

Public programs are made possible, in part, by the Rita and Frits Markus Fund for Public Understanding of Science.

GLOBAL WEEKENDS

Indigenous Peoples and Biodiversity in the Amazon

Saturday, 5/3,3:00-3:00 p.m.

Indigenous leaders from the Amazon, United Nations representatives, and environmental activists discuss critical issues facing the Amazon rain forest. …

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