Blood on German Snow: An African American Artilleryman in World War II and Beyond

By Tate, Robert F. | Air & Space Power Journal, Summer 2008 | Go to article overview

Blood on German Snow: An African American Artilleryman in World War II and Beyond


Tate, Robert F., Air & Space Power Journal


Blood on German Snow: An African American Artilleryman in World War II and Beyond by Emiel W. Owens. Texas A&M University Press (http:// www.tamu.edu/upress), John H. Lindsey Building, Lewis Street, 4354 TAMU, College Station, Texas 77843-4354, 2006, 160 pages, $24.95 (hardcover).

I'm continually drawn to memoirs of men who fought in World War II. To me, reading about their experiences and recollections is infinitely more interesting than the cold facts and bland rehashing of unit movements and battle progressions. When authors can tie such an important part of their lives to a historical event, it makes that situation much more memorable. In other words, I love reading memoirs. Let me rephrase that: I love reading "most" memoirs.

In Blood on German Snow, the author gives us insight into the life of a black soldier fighting against the forces of Nazism in Europe during a time in our history marked with decidedly dark undercurrents. Emiel W. Owens is an interesting man whose life shines with the academic achievements that most people can only dream about. Holding a PhD in economics from Ohio State University, he has taught and lectured around the world, including Europe and Africa. His life after the war makes for a compelling study in itself.

Born in the small town of Smithville, Texas, in 1922, Owens grew up in the usual, repressive Jim Crow environment found throughout the South. Due to the influence of his family, however, he obtained an excellent education. His love of learning and academic achievement stayed with him his entire life. In 1943 Owens was drafted into the Army, where he became part of the segregated 777th Field Artillery Battalion, in which he served throughout the European conflict.

Regarding Blood on German Snow as a memoir, I have to say that in some ways it disappointed me. One would expect much more discussion of the author's contributions and experiences in combat. This book reveals that he had many of them. That is not to say he doesn't relate any of these stories, but only 57 pages cover the actual fighting in Europe. This includes his initial arrival on the continent through the German surrender. Although the author's unit took part in the deadly fighting inside the Hurtgen Forest in November 1944, for example, one finds surprisingly little detail about the fighting. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Blood on German Snow: An African American Artilleryman in World War II and Beyond
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.