Emotional Intelligence and Self-Efficacy in a Sample of Italian High School Teachers

By Di Fabio, Annamaria; Palazzeschi, Letizia | Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal, March 15, 2008 | Go to article overview

Emotional Intelligence and Self-Efficacy in a Sample of Italian High School Teachers


Di Fabio, Annamaria, Palazzeschi, Letizia, Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal


The aim in this study was to further analyze the construct of emotional intelligence and its relation to occupational self-efficacy in a sample of Italian teachers. The Italian version of the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory: Short (Bar-On, 2002) and the Ohio State Teacher Efficacy Scale (Tschannen-Moran & Woolfolk-Hoy, 2001) were administered to 169 participants. Significant differences in emotional intelligence emerged with respect to age. In comparison to females, males obtained higher scores in the intrapersonal dimension, while women scored higher on the interpersonal dimension. Teacher self-efficacy was best explained by the intrapersonal dimension. The study indicates both a need for further analysis of the emotional intelligence of teachers and new areas of possible research.

Keywords: emotional intelligence, self-efficacy, teachers, high school, Italian context.

The term emotional intelligence, rendered popular by Goleman (1995), was first used by Salovey and Mayer (1990) to describe the capacity individuals have for monitoring their feelings and those of others, discriminating between various types of emotions and using this information to channel thoughts and actions. Subsequently, Mayer and Salovey (1997) extended the definition to include the capacity for perceiving emotions, comparing emotions and feelings, understanding information caused by emotion and being able to handle such emotions. According to the theoretical model of Bar-On (1997, 2000), emotional intelligence is defined as a sum of emotional and social competences that determine the modalities with which a persona relates to both him/herself and to others in order to cope with environmental pressure and requests. Emotional intelligence is thus, in this model, an important factor in determining success in life and, more generically, influences the well-being of individuals. Emotional intelligence develops over time, changes in the course of life, and can be increased by means of training programs.

There has been an increasing interest in the construct of emotional intelligence within a school context. Although some studies in the field of education have been focused on the emotional intelligence of students and on the role that this plays with respect to academic achievement, demonstrating that students with higher emotional intelligence had more success at school (Di Fabio, Giorgi, & Palazzeschi, 2005; Parker et al., 2004; Parker, Summerfeldt, Hogan, & Majeski, 2002), other studies have demonstrated that teachers who promote emotional intelligence skills emphasize the value of individual differences, enhance group work and problem-solving ability, and channel students to develop adequate social competences (Kaufhold & Johnson, 2005). These social competences increase the relationship among pupils, their reciprocal respect and involvement in class activities (Obiakor, 2001).

To encourage emotional intelligence in students, it is necessary to sustain them by means of didactic activities and guidance that entail the use of emotional intelligence in relation to empathy and other sociointerpersonal areas (Chan & Hui, 1998). Teachers frequently express a concern of being inadequately prepared to lead such interventions and feel reluctant to take on such a role (Chan, 1992). Although the basic idea of teacher efficacy may be tied to professional formation, it could also be proposed that teachers who possess low self-efficacy also have lower emotional intelligence (Chan, 2004). With reference to the connection between emotional intelligence and teacher self-efficacy, Chan (2004) used the Emotional Intelligence Scale (EIS; Schutte et al., 1998) to measure emotional intelligence. Chan demonstrated that teachers obtain a higher score in the positive utilization dimension, which refers to positive exploitation of emotions, and the emotional appraisal dimension, which expresses the level of awareness of emotional evaluation, followed by the empathie sensitivity dimension, empathy or general sensitivity to the emotional expressions of others, and lastly, by the positive regulation dimension, the positive handling of emotions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Emotional Intelligence and Self-Efficacy in a Sample of Italian High School Teachers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.