Empire and the Literature of Sensation, an Anthology of Nineteenth-Century Popular Fiction

By Higgins, Ellen F. | Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA), June 2008 | Go to article overview

Empire and the Literature of Sensation, an Anthology of Nineteenth-Century Popular Fiction


Higgins, Ellen F., Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA)


Empire and the Literature of Sensation, an Anthology of Nineteenth-Century Popular Fiction Jess Alemàn and Shelley Streeby, Eds. Piscataway, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2007.

Empire and the Literature of Sensation is a critical anthology of nineteenth-century popular, sensational literature that deals with war and empire-building by the United States-long before most history books date this activity, namely the Spanish-American War of 1898. This book demonstrates how much of the preceding century consisted of the enactment of Manifest Destiny doctrine and formalized issues of gender, race, and class that haunt us today, whether in the media activity supporting contemporary imperialism in Iraq or in the immigration debates in which the immigrant is cast as "other," as non-American.

The anthology builds naturally from the authors' work: Alemàn specializes in nineteenthcentury American and Chicano/a literatures, with a focus on the United States-Mexico War (184648) as an important intersection in the formation of Anglo and Mexican American literary and cultural identities. Streeby specializes in, among other areas, Sensationalism, Popular Culture, Inter-American Studies, and US Imperialism.

Indeed, Empire and the Literature of Sensation highlights five of the texts Streeby discusses in her earlier cultural study, texts not otherwise available or easily accessible. There are two pamphlet narratives in the early sensational market fictional autobiographical style which are first-person accounts of crossed-dressed females engaging in military actions, one reportedly by Sophia Delaplain and the other, The Female Warrior, by Leonora Siddons. There are two story paper novelettes by popular and prolific sensational male writers: Magdalena, The Beautiful Mexican Maid by Ned Buntline and 'Bel of Prairie Eden by George Lippard. The anthology concludes with one of the first of Beadle's dime novels, The Prisoner of La Vintresse, written by May Andrews Denison, one of many women constituting some forty percent of the dime novel authors in this era.

The editors provide an excellent introduction, establishing literary, historical, and cultural contexts for the readings and presenting their case that US imperialism generated domestic and cultural instability during the period of the American literary renaissance. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Empire and the Literature of Sensation, an Anthology of Nineteenth-Century Popular Fiction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.