Child Honoring: How to Turn This World Around

By Walsh, Christine A. | Journal of Comparative Family Studies, Spring 2008 | Go to article overview

Child Honoring: How to Turn This World Around


Walsh, Christine A., Journal of Comparative Family Studies


Cavoukian, R. and S. Olfman (Eds.). CHILD HONORING: HOW TO TURN THIS WORLD AROUND. Praeger Publishers, 2006, 278 pp., $29.95 USA.

Raffi, well known children's troubadour, has developed his child-first approach into a simple philosophy that centers our obligation to children as a way to improve the "state of the world and the health of children" (p. xxi). In creating 'A Covenant for Honoring Children' he asserts that our duty to the future generations of children is analogous to the vision articulated in the United States Declaration of Independence. This stance is championed in the collected anthology, Child Honoring: How to turn this world around, which he co-edits with Sharna Olfman, child psychologist and author of, Childhood Lost: How American Culture is failing Our Children.

This compilation of 19 stories are an engaging, thought-provoking examination of the ways in which the creation of a world appropriate to meet the needs of a developing child is congruent both with developing solutions to remedy emerging environmental and social challenges and also in contributing to the establishment of a world capable of supporting human kind and, indeed, all living beings.

Their stories are woven with an appealing mixture of science, philosophy and heart. This unique collection employs multiple voices with distinctive perspectives to describe the ecology of the child. The authors suggest that embracing and nurturing each child becomes not only the responsibility of the parents, but also the local and global community. At first glance the authors of the stories, esteemed in their respective professions, seem to have little in common. Largely drawn from academic fields including law, psychology, physics, biology, psychiatry and theology they include indigenous educators, fiction writers and child and women's rights advocates. The one thing they share is their clearly articulated passion and vision for the realization of a world fit for a child, all children. …

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