Mutuality Matters: Family, Faith and Just Love

By Moulaison, Jane Barter | Journal of Comparative Family Studies, Spring 2008 | Go to article overview

Mutuality Matters: Family, Faith and Just Love


Moulaison, Jane Barter, Journal of Comparative Family Studies


Anderson, Herbert, Edward Foley, Bonnie Miller-McLemore and Robert Schreiter (Eds.). MUTUALITY MATTERS: FAMILY, FAITH AND JUST LOVE. Toronto: Rowman and Littlefield, 2004.

Almost sixty years ago, Simone de Beauvoir wrote: "The whole of feminine history has been man-made. ...Men have presumed to create a feminine domain-the kingdom of life, of immanence-only to lock up women therein"* For better or worse, the Christian faith has contributed much to such a kingdom. The world of immanence, the world of caring for the young, infirm, and old has been regarded almost universally within the Christian church as the special calling of Jesus' followers, and as feminist commentators have pointed out, this sacrificial work is mandated disproportionately to women. The authors of this anthology agree that the church has neglected justice and mutuality in its commendation of the ideal of self-sacrifice. This is especially evident within the family. These essays offer a rethinking of Christian relationships through conversations with secular movements toward equality, particularly feminism. As Paul Waddell puts it: "Mutuality matters because it is only in relationships where love is given and received, where persons are affirmed, challenged and respected, that we mirror the divine love that completes us." (p. 13).

In many of the essays, authors look to ways that the church's lack of mutuality might be reformed through the application of secular theories. For example, James N. Poling urges that systems theory, drawn from secular counselling, be applied to the interpretation of power dynamics within a given congregation. Such theory calls upon pastors to exercise critical self-awareness with regard to their use of authority. Dianne Bergant, commenting on the familial norms delineated in the Book of Sirach, utilizes the critical tools of hermeneutics in order to "refashion the tradition,"( 164) thereby challenging the abiding relevancy of Sirach's patriarchal codes.

At times, criticism flows the other way, as the church is viewed as a potential balm for society's ills. Homer U. Ashby Jr., sees the Black Church as a potential source for the renewal of black families as fathers are both challenged to remain active within the children's lives and are nurtured in spiritual disciplines in order to do so by the still robust fellowship that exists in many black American churches. Bonnie Miller- McLemore's wonderful essay challenges "sloppy conceptions of mutuality" (126) which predominate in the wider culture which fail to assess adequately power structures within relationships of care. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Mutuality Matters: Family, Faith and Just Love
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.