Workplace Romances

By Johnson, Robert Roy | Law & Order, June 2008 | Go to article overview

Workplace Romances


Johnson, Robert Roy, Law & Order


The nature of police work, with its inherent danger, requires officers to trust each other with their lives. Consequently, police officers, especially partners, form intense bonds. Most department relationships are extremely close and remain simply friendly, but a few-not surprisinglylead to romantic entanglements. These workplace romances raise issues for police managers.

As is done in some private sector workplaces, chiefs could simply implement written policy prohibiting workplace romance. Realistically, however, love will not be denied. As a police manager, if you occasionally find it difficult to achieve blanket compliance on something as minor as a uniform regulation, how successful might you be in quashing passion?

First and foremost, as with all personnel issues, it is essential that supervisors have personal relationships with their officers that are based on mutual respect and trust. When the lines of communication are open, it is much more likely the supervisors will have the information necessary to address developing situations.

On occasion, a situation may arise involving officers, one or both of whom are married to or seriously involved with other people. Whether there actually is romance, or merely ungrounded suspicion, the police manager should be prepared for an officer's significant other to request a meeting. The supervisor cannot take this lightly.

Affairs are painful experiences for those betrayed. They often lead to the breakup of marriages and families. Emotions run high, sometimes leading to violence and tragedy. It is the wise captain who is poised to address the concerns of the troubled mate. There are no easy answers. Each circumstance will dictate the appropriate action. But the police manager should be prepared to offer resources, such as counseling or professional intervention.

Where there is romance, one or both of the involved parties may become jealous of interactions the other may have with fellow officers. Jealousy in a relationship takes on an ominous dimension in a workplace where the employees are armed. As law enforcement managers know, it is essential that all of the officers on the watch operate as a team. These officers need to respect each other professionally and personally.

Jealousy is a complex emotion that often leads to overreactions and could compromise the integrity of the cohesive squad the captain has meticulously crafted. What normally would be considered as friendly banter or congenial interactions among department officers can be misconstrued by a jealous lover. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Workplace Romances
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.