The Irish College at Santiago De Compostela, 1605-1769

By O'Donoghue, Fergus | The Catholic Historical Review, July 2008 | Go to article overview

The Irish College at Santiago De Compostela, 1605-1769


O'Donoghue, Fergus, The Catholic Historical Review


The Irish College at Santiago de Compostela, 1605-1769. By Patricia O'Connell. (Dublin: Four Courts Press. 2007. Pp. 158. $55.00.)

Number 44 on Rua Nova in Santiago de Compostella is a typical Galician townhouse in a narrow street, but it has a remarkable history as the home of the Irish College from 1616 to 1769 and is part of a great story: traditional Irish contacts with Galicia as a place of pilgrimage; Irish resistance to the spread of English control and promotion of Protestantism; Spanish determination to make Ireland "England's Netherlands," as revenge for English support of Dutch rebellion; and the success of the Irish Counter-Reformation.

There were twenty-nine Irish colleges in Continental Europe, six of them in Iberia. Patricia O'Connell already published studies of the first (Lisbon, 1590) and the last (Alcala de Henares, 1649). Santiago, whose geographical closeness to Ireland is often overlooked, provides a rich source for research. Much is known about the lifestyle of the students, who studied philosophy for two years, prior to going to the Irish College at Salamanca for three years of theology. The Santiago College could support no more than sixteen students at any given time, but biographical details are incomplete, despite the sixty-nine pages of biographical information given here. There may have been a total of, at least, 535 students, but erratic record-keeping means that accounts of arrivals at Salamanca do not always have corresponding documentation of departures from Santiago and sometimes we have numbers, but no names.

The Irish exiles in Galicia wanted a boarding school or a student residence at Santiago, and the college was founded as such in 1605 under the guidance of the O'Sullivan family. Within six years, there were rumors that the Jesuits would be given control of the college, and this transfer, fiercely opposed, was made public, on the orders of Philip III, on April 5,1613. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Irish College at Santiago De Compostela, 1605-1769
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.