Bears in Economics

By Korsawe, Caroline | Baylor Business Review, Fall 2007 | Go to article overview

Bears in Economics


Korsawe, Caroline, Baylor Business Review


economics: the science that deals with the production, distribution, and econsumption of goods and services, or the material welfare of humankind.

With such a definition, a background in economics could only lay the groundwork for careers as diverse as the students themselves. Baylor economics graduates are no exception. Not only are economics graduates scholars, economists and lawyers, but also diplomats, physicians, judges and entrepreneurs. We have profiled some successful alumni of Hankamer's Economics department as they make their marks on their communities, states and the world.

Living ahead of the curve

An Austin-based entrepreneur and private investor, BBA IN ECONOMICS 1989, MS 1990, JD 1993 I starts and sells companies in various industries. In 1995, he co-founded LandTel Communications LLC, the market leader in satellite services for drilling platforms. In 2006, Davis and his partners sold majority interest to a private equity syndicate. In 1997, Davis co-founded Aquatica, Inc., a commercial diving firm serving the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, exiting in 1999 via sale to publicly held CaI Dive International.

Davis remains active in energy and clean technology investments. He is a Managing Member of Rapid Energy Services, LLC, which sells solutions for the energy, maritime and aviation industries. He is the largest shareholder of one of the country's five largest biodiesel facilities. He is also a managing director of Westlake securities, an Austin- and Houston-based investment bank that raises capital and provides mergers and acquisions advisory services for clients.

After a few minutes with him, it's clear that Davis savors the entrepreneurial process. Asked for advice to budding entrepreneurs, Davis says that a critical part of his project filter is the integrity of the people involved.

"I am constantly impressed with the creativity and energy of entrepreneurs. But none of that matters if they don't have integrity," says Davis. He encourages young entrepreneurs to surround themselves with people of character, especially mentors "with a little gray hair."

"Some things only come with experience," he says.

Davis cites luck and timing as key complements to hard work in determining the success of a business. "Outsized returns come from investing in a talented team in an industry with the wind at its back. Even the best of teams have a much harder time if they're not in a growth sector," he continues. "The art is anticipating what that next sector will be."

He also cautions that he, like other entrepreneurs, "has to remember that although current capital markets can 'make a genius of an idiot,' the halcyon days never continue uninterrupted."

The biggest challenge in what he does? Time in the day. He laughs and says that if you want to talk to the real multi-tasker in the family, it's his wife, Julie, who's been a stay-at-home mom with their three daughters, Parker, Alex and Gate (11, 9 and 7). "Anytime I think I have a lot going on, I simply need to exchange calendars with Julie."

"Outsized returns come from investing in a talented team in an industry with the wind at its back. Even the best of teams have a much harder time if they're not in a growth sector, the art is aniticipating what that next sector will be."

Lifelong dedication to public service

Jennifer Elrod | HOUSTON | BA IN ECONOMICS, 1988 | is currently judge of the 190th District Court in Houston's Harris County. Elrod has served as a state court judge since 2002 and has recently been nominated by President George W. Bush to serve on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.

During the course of her career as a judge she has presided over more than 200 jury and non-jury trials with the foremost goal of serving people and her community. Prior to becoming a judge, Elrod was an attorney in Houston at the top national firm, Baker Botts L.L.P.

One of Elrod's lifelong dreams was to help other people. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Bears in Economics
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.