The Effects of a Laban/Bartenieff-Based Movement Program with Music on Physical Function Measures in Older Adults

By Hamburg, Janet; Clair, Alicia Ann | Music Therapy Perspectives, January 1, 2008 | Go to article overview

The Effects of a Laban/Bartenieff-Based Movement Program with Music on Physical Function Measures in Older Adults


Hamburg, Janet, Clair, Alicia Ann, Music Therapy Perspectives


ABSTRACT: A group of 20 healthy older adults (females = 17, males = 3), who ranged in age from 66 to 84 years, participated in a movement program designed to enhance functional outcomes. The program, Motivating Moves®, was designed by a Laban movement analyst. It consisted of 14 movement sequences set to music especially composed to reflect the dynamics, rhythm, timing, and phrasing of the movements. After 5 weeks, individuals showed statistically significant increases in Reuben's Physical Performance Test (Reuben & Siu, 1990) in areas of gait speed and putting on and removing a jacket. For those persons (n = 5) who extended their involvement beyond 5 weeks, additional changes were not statistically significant. All participants indicated through anonymous comments that they experienced positive physical outcomes, that they enjoyed the program, and that they would recommend it to others.

Individuals 85 years and older comprise the fastest growing segment of the world's population, and projections have indicated there will be 70 million people age 65 years or older in the United States by the year 2030 (Mazzeo et al., 1998). With this increase in older individuals, it is essential to identify ways to maintain good physical functioning that serve to improve overall life quality while they promote independence (Mazzeo et al., 1998; Seeman et al., 1995). Research has shown that active lifestyle habits into late years reduce disability or compress it into a shorter period toward the end of life, which decreases overall lifetime disability and decreases health care costs (Garrett, Brasure, Schmitz, Schultz, & Huber, 2004; Hubert, Bloch, Oehlert, & Fries, 2002; Leveille, Guralnik, Ferrucci, & Langlois, 1999).

While evidence shows that physically active lifestyles reduce the risks for mortality and lead to longer, healthy lives (Sundquist, Qvist, Sundquist, & Johansson, 2004), the most sedentary segment of the adult population is over the age of 50 with the greatest number of sedentary persons older than 75 years (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1996). Researchers have found that this group accounts for the largest proportion of chronic disease and disability in the United States and requires the largest proportion of health care dollars (Berg & Casells, 1990.; Hoffman, Rice, & Sung, 1996; LaPlant, 1989). Research has also shown that some chronic health conditions begin as early as age 50 (Huang et al., 1998), yet these conditions have a potential for prevention (Berg & Casells, 1990; Hoffman et al., 1996; LaPlant, 1989; Lonegran & Krevans, 1992).

Researchers have found that functional decline tends to increase as people age. Yet, physical activity can build physical function that facilitates persons' abilities to perform activities of daily living, adding to life quality (Pollock, Graves, Swart, & Lowenthal, 1994). Research has also shown that deteriorated physical strength and flexibility can lead to falls, which may result in the most serious injuries experienced by older adults (Province et al., 1995) and even death (Sattin, 1992). Those who survive falls have experienced decline in activities of daily living, physical activities, and social interactions (Dunn, Rudberg, Furner, & Cassel, 1992; Kiel, O'Sullivan, Teno, & Mor, 1991) and have greater incidences of institutionalization (Tinetti, Liu, & Claus, 1993). Participation in moderate or strenuous activity is associated with improved physical performance in older adults even when they have compromised baseline health (seeman et al., 1995).

Most falls in older adults are caused by physical deficits in strength, reaction time, and flexibility (Province et al., 1995) and by disturbances in balance (Cho & Kamen, 1998; Hornbrook et al., 1994; Province et al., 1995; Tinetti et al., 1994; Tinetti, Speechley, & Cinter, 1988; Tinetti, Williams, & Mayewski, 1986) and gait (Cho & Kamen, 1998; Hornbrook et al. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Effects of a Laban/Bartenieff-Based Movement Program with Music on Physical Function Measures in Older Adults
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.