150 Best Jobs through Military Training

By Ruck, Janet M. | Career Planning and Adult Development Journal, Spring 2008 | Go to article overview

150 Best Jobs through Military Training


Ruck, Janet M., Career Planning and Adult Development Journal


150 Best Jobs Through Military Training, by Laurence Shatkin 2008. Indianapolis, IN: Jist Works 402 pages, $19.95, Softcover

Intended Audience(s): A, B, C, F, G, H, I, K

Major Headings from the Table of Contents:

Overview of Military Training; Descriptions of the Military Jobs that Provide Training for the 150 Best Civilian Jobs; The Best Jobs Lists; Descriptions of the Best Civilian Jobs through Military Training; Resources for Further Exploration; Military Jobs Not Described in This Book

How Is the Book Most Useful for Its Intended Audience?

Provides data compiled from the Department of Defense, Department of Labor, and the Census Bureau to create lists of jobs in the civilian workforce for which military experience provides preparation.

The Top Five Things You Learned from Reading this Book:

The variety of jobs available in the civilian workforce utilizing skills from the military.

The far-reaching impact of military training throughout the workforce (e.g., self-employment, part-time work availability).

The personality and interest types across many military positions.

Transferability of skills within and across military and civilian sectors of the work force.

The vast amount of information available to veterans which can assist them in transitioning from the military to civilian work.

There are positives and negatives about being a job seeker in the current information age. The positives include the fact that there is so much information at the job seeker's disposal. The negatives include the fact that there is so much information at the job seeker's disposal. Luckily for job seekers who are considering or who have had a military career, the authors of 150 Best Jobs through Military Training have done much research about civilian careers which harness the knowledge and expertise gained in the military. By combining occupation data from the Department of Defense (DOD), the Department of Labor (DOL), and the Census Bureau, the authors have provided readers with a gold mine of information in one place.

Some of the ways in which readers can use the book include:

* Development of long-term career plans for jobs that utilize military training;

* Identification of jobs that use military training that readers already possess;

* Preparation for discussion of career goals with a military recruiter;

* Preparation for interviews by relating military-acquired skills to a career goal.

The book's criteria for best jobs include positions that have high pay, high growth, or large numbers of openings. By definition, there are several types of jobs that are excluded. For example, officer-level jobs are not included, because considerable education and training are required prior to entering the military. In addition, jobs that do not have a civilian equivalent (e.g., infantry) are excluded. There are currently 141 military jobs, officially known by the armed forces as military occupational training database [MOTD], which represent a family of job titles. The book only describes 75 of these military jobs, due to the fact that many of them are officer-level or require a great deal of training prior to the military. The remaining 66 MOTDs are listed in one of the appendices.

The book is organized around several major categories, making it useful for audiences to seek information based on the data most relevant to them. The overview of military training is very helpful for individuals considering a military career and its transferability of expertise into a civilian career. …

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