Career Ideas for Kids Who like Animals and Nature

By Cheek, Freddie | Career Planning and Adult Development Journal, Spring 2008 | Go to article overview

Career Ideas for Kids Who like Animals and Nature


Cheek, Freddie, Career Planning and Adult Development Journal


Career Ideas for Kids Who Like Animals and Nature by Diane Reeves and Lindsey Clasen 2007. New York, NY: Ferguson Publishing 200 pages per volume, $280 for 10-volume set, Hardback

Representative careers in the other books in the series include:

Career Ideas for Kids Who Like Writing: Author, Book Producer, Editor, Freelance Writer, Journalist, Librarian, Literary Agent, and Publicist

Career Ideas for Kids Who Like Adventure and Travel: Airport Personnel, Cruise Director, Detective, Expedition Leader, Firefighter, Foreign Correspondent, Military Serviceperson, and Travel Agent

Career Ideas for Kids Who Like Science: Archaeologist, Chemist, Food Scientist, Nutritionist, Oceanographer, Robotics Technician, Science Educator, and Veterinarian

Career Ideas for Kids Who Like Talking: Air Traffic Controller, Broadcaster, hotel Manager, News Reporter, Publicist, Retailer, Speech Pathologist, and Telemarketer

Career Ideas for Kids Who Like Sports: Athlete, Coach, Fitness Instructor, Recreation Director, Sportscaster, Sports Event Coordinator, Sports Pro, and Sportswriter

Career Ideas for Kids Who Like Music and Dance: Arts Administrator, Composer, Dance Instructor, Disc Jockey, Music Video Producer, Musician, Recording Executive, and Sound Engineer

Career Ideas for Kids Who Like Math and Money: Actuary, Banker, Emerchant, International Trade Specialist, Lawyer, Stockbroker, Urban Planner, Venture Capitalist

Career Ideas for Kids Who Like Computers: Artificial Intelligence Scientist, Computer Programmer, Hardware Engineer, Online Researcher, Systems Analyst, Technical Support Representative, Trainer, and Webmaster

Career Ideas for Kids Who Like Art: Animator, Artist, Choreographer, Fashion Designer, Graphic Designer, Industrial Designer, Museum Curator, and Photojournalist

Intended Audience(s): C, F

Major Headings from the Table of Contents:

Make a Choice; How to Use this Book; Get in Gear (Five Discovery Points); Take a Trip (List of Career Titles); Make a Natural Detour; Don't Stop Now (6 Steps); What's Next (Five Rediscovery Points); Hooray, You Did It; Some Future Destinations.

How Is the Book Most Useful for Its Intended Audience?

Students, ages 10-13, are afforded an opportunity to start thinking about appropriate and interesting career options.

The Top Five Things You Learned from Reading this Book

Young children can start to think in terms of career.

Career information can be presented in a kid-friendly manner.

A large range of careers will be of interest to children.

There are numerous age-appropriate websites dedicated to career information.

Self-assessment can be customized for children.

This completely revised series consists of the second edition of 10 volumes: Career Ideas for Kids Who Like: Adventure and Travel, Animals and Nature (reviewed below), Art, Computers, Math and Money, Music and Dance, Science, Sports, Talking, and Writing.

These delightful books are well written for a young reader, filled with age-appropriate writing, fun graphics, and photos. …

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