Posthumous Honor for Soltys

Aging Today, May/June 2008 | Go to article overview

Posthumous Honor for Soltys


"All of us want to leave the world feeling that we have made a difference. We want to have the freedom to find meaning in our lives and share that meaning with our family, our friends and the larger community... As you age, your experience and learning expand to an understanding that is sometimes referred to as wisdom."

These wise and hopeful words were among the last published by Florence Gray Soltys. Ironically, she wrote them for her chapter titled "Reminiscence, Grief, Loss and End of Life" in what would be her first book, Transformational Reminiscence: Life Story Work, coauthored with John A. Kunz and additional contributors. The volume was published by Springer last fall, shortly following Soltys' death in September from complications following a car accident. She was age 72.

SOLTYS' LEGACY

During its recent national meeting in Washington, D.C., the American Society on Aging (ASA) board of directors honored Soltys and her considerable legacy with the ASA Leadership Award. Nationally recognized as an expert on and advocate for the needs of older adults, Soltys retired only a year ago from her position as a clinical associate professor at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, in both the schools of medicine and social work. …

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