Sweet Shopping in Sugarhouse

By Rainey, Virginia | Sunset, September 2002 | Go to article overview

Sweet Shopping in Sugarhouse


Rainey, Virginia, Sunset


Find treasures for your home in a quaint Salt Lake City neighborhood

When I was a kid, I always jumped at the chance to go shopping in Sugarhouse. I fantasized that somewhere in this bustling Salt Lake City neighborhood, I'd discover an entire house made of candy. I only recently discovered that the district grew on the site of a sugar beet processing factory that was built by pioneers in the 1890s and demolished after six years. So much for the romance of a name.

Today, despite the new Sugarhouse Commons shopping area full of national chains, old Sugarhouse still feeds my fantasies with its eclectic array of locally owned shops, many complete with their original, kitschy signage. I love to wander through the jam-packed galleries, antiques shops, and consignment stores, discovering places where you can find the perfect sunglasses or get a psychic reading.

It's a fine area to browse for home furnishings, and a good place to begin is Bountiful Home. The former auto body repair shop is stacked to the steel rafters with 19th-century French furnishings, all with that distressed look that says faded chic, but not cheap. The mirrors, iron-frame daybeds, crystal chandeliers, etched goblets, and vintage wicker are all wonderfully frilly and full of possibility.

It's a quick stroll over to Hip tic Humble. The renovated 1920s mechanics' garage is full of both faux and real vintage items: framed windows painted with the names of Parisian cafes and hotels, custom-framed beds, comfy chairs, bejeweled lamps, tea towels, and accessories for kids' rooms, from retro to fancy. …

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