Chronology: Pakistan

The Middle East Journal, Summer 2002 | Go to article overview

Chronology: Pakistan


See also, Central Asia and the Caucasus, Information Technology, Regional Affairs

2002

Jan. 16: Pakistan's military government abolished electoral laws that allowed religious minorities to elect only representatives of their respective communities. The Associated Press of Pakistan (APP) reported that the government was reforming the Lower House of Parliament to make it more democratic. [BBC, 1/16]

Jan. 17: Police in Pakistan registered the case of unidentified gunmen, who injured five people in the Lahore airport, under an anti-terrorism law. [BBC, 1/17]

Jan. 18: The World Health Organization reported that hundreds of Pakistanis contracted a potentially fatal skin disease that spread from Afghan refugees. [BBC, 1/18]

After speaking with US Secretary of State Colin Powell, Pakistani President Musharraf told the Indian press that he believed in the potential for a resolution to the military conflict between the two countries. He also warned religious extremists not to interfere with Pakistan's foreign policy. Powell echoed Musharraf's statements. [BBC, 118] Jan. 20: Authorities in Pakistan announced that they would not permit Indian wheat travelling from Afghanistan to pass through Pakistani land in response to reports that the wheat was infested with fungus and diseases. [BBC, 1/201

Jan. 21: Police in Indian-administered Kashmir reported that twelve members of a Muslim family in the Salva village were killed by suspected militants. Eight of the killed were children. [BBC, 1/211

Jan. 22: Gunmen attacked the US Government Information Center in Calcutta, killing five policemen and wounding twenty others. A spokesman for Pakistan's Foreign Ministry, Muhammad `Aziz Khan, denied India's allegations that Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence was involved in the attack. [BBC, 1/22]

Jan. 23: Pakistani Government offered use of the Karachi airport to the international peacekeeping force in Afghanistan. [BBC, 1/23]

Indian police detained fifty people in connection with the attack on the US Government Information Center in Calcutta, which killed five people, and injured twenty others. Indian officials blamed the attack on militants connected to Pakistan's InterServices Intelligence. [BBC, 1/22, 1/23] Jan. 25: A Pakistani Foreign Office statement criticized India's decision to testlaunch a nuclear-capable ballistic missile, saying the test would be "prejudicial to the pursuit of stability in [the] region, especially during the current situation." [BBC, 1/25]

During a trip to Islamabad, UN Secretary General Kofi Annan stressed the need for Pakistan and India to resolve their differences peacefully. [BBC, 1/25]

During a meeting of the Pakistan Human Development Forum, President Musharraf announced that elections would be held in October to end the military rule. [BBC, 1/ 25]

Jan. 26: President Musharraf extended an invitation to Prime Minister Vajpayee to engage in talks aimed at reducing tensions between Pakistan and India. [BBC, 1/26]

President Musharraf expressed to the British newspaper The Times that continuing his rule another five years was integral to Pakistan's stability. [BBC, 1/26]

Jan. 28: Two earthquakes, measuring 4.5 and 5.2 on the Richter Scale, shook Lahore, Himachal Pradesh, and Jammu and Kashmir. [BBC, 1/28]

The National Movement for the Restoration of Pakistani Sovereignty claimed responsibility for the kidnapping of US journalist Daniel Pearl, stating that Pearl's living conditions would improve only if the living situation for al-Qa'ida detainees at Camp X-Ray in Guantanamo Bay also improved. [BBC, 1/28]

Jan. 29: Indian Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Nirupama Rao voiced India's rejection of Pakistan's offer to hold talks about a phased withdrawal of troops along the countries' shared border unless Pakistan stopped what she termed "cross-border terrorism" and "harboring terrorists. …

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