Business Case Studies - Applied GCSE Business

By Widdowson, Paul | Teaching Business & Economics, Summer 2008 | Go to article overview

Business Case Studies - Applied GCSE Business


Widdowson, Paul, Teaching Business & Economics


Business Case Studies - Applied GCSE Business, Margaret Hancock and John Evans-Pritchard, 178 pages, spiral bound, £90, Causeway Press, ISBN 978-1-4058-6448-0

This is a photocopiable resource with 32 engaging case studies. Each is accompanied by a glossary, questions, practical activities and suggestions for structuring GCSE answers. Besides the version reviewed here, there is a sister publication for GCSE Business Studies. Teachers can pick and choose what they want to photocopy for class use.

As an Applied GCSE Business teacher, I always look for resources that are directly relevant to the criteria for the portfolio units, units 1 and 2. Recent moderator reports seem to indicate that it is very important that student portfolios hit the criteria to the letter. We need one business that can be covered in depth for each bullet point. In my view, this is how an Applied GCSE portfolio has to be compiled.

Most of these case studies relate to one or two unit titles. This focus on more than one topic reduces the usefulness of each case study for the individual unit criteria. This means that the case studies are mostly useful to make sure students understand concepts. Only in the more traditionally taught unit 3 (Business Finance), where there is an examination, will the relevant case studies be used by me extensively. …

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