Legume Anchor Markers Link Syntenic Regions between Phaseolus Vulgaris, Lotus Japonicus, Medicago Truncatula and Arachis

By Hougaard, Birgit Kristine; Madsen, Lene Heegaard et al. | Genetics, August 2008 | Go to article overview

Legume Anchor Markers Link Syntenic Regions between Phaseolus Vulgaris, Lotus Japonicus, Medicago Truncatula and Arachis


Hougaard, Birgit Kristine, Madsen, Lene Heegaard, Sandal, Niels, de Carvalho Moretzsohn, Marcio, Fredslund, Jakob, Schauser, Leif, Nielsen, Anna Marie, Rohde, Trine, Sato, Shusei, Tabata, Satoshi, Bertioli, David John, Stougaard, Jens, Genetics


ABSTRACT

We have previously described a bioinformatics pipeline identifying comparative anchor-tagged sequence (CATS) loci, combined with design of intron-spanning primers. The derived anchor markers defining the linkage position of homologous genes are essential for evaluating genome conservation among related species and facilitate transfer of genetic and genome information between species. Here we validate this global approach in the common bean and in the AA genome complement of the allotetraploid peanut. We present the successful conversion of ~50% of the bioinformatics-defined primers into legume anchor markers in bean and diploid Arachis species. One hundred and four new loci representing single-copy genes were added to the existing bean map. These new legume anchor-marker loci enabled the alignment of genetic linkage maps through corresponding genes and provided an estimate of the extent of synteny and collinearity. Extensive macrosynteny between Lotus and bean was uncovered on 8 of the 11 bean chromosomes and large blocks of macrosynteny were also found between bean and Medicago. This suggests that anchor markers can facilitate a better understanding of the genes and genetics of important traits in crops with largely uncharacterized genomes using genetic and genome information from related model plants.

THE legume family (Leguminosae) is the third largest family of higher plants and includes >19,000 species (Lewis et al. 2005). Plants belonging to the family are diverse, and trees, shrubby perennials, annual herbs, ornamentals as well as agriculturally important crops are represented. Legumes play a critical role in natural ecosystems, agriculture, and agroforestry, where their ability to establish symbiosis with nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria makes them efficient colonizers of low-nitrogen environments and desirable protein crops. Phaseolus vulgaris L. (common bean) is a particularly important source of protein. It serves as a staple food known as the poor man's meat and contains dietary fiber, minerals, vitamins, and various health promoting compounds (Guillon and Champ 2002; Leterme 2002). Arachis hypogaea (cultivated peanut) is in addition to being consumed in many human foods, the fifth most important oil crop and also a rich source of dietary protein for the chicken and pork industries (Graham and Vance 2003).

The legume family is divided into three subfamilies: Caesalpinioideae, Mimosoideae, and Papilionoideae. Most of the economically important legumes are members of the monophyletic subfamily Papilionoideae, which can be divided into four major clades. Although the legumes included in our study, Lotus japonicus, Medicago truncatula, bean, and Arachis are all in the Papilionoideae subfamily, they belong to three different clades: halogalegina, phaseoloid/millettioid, and aeschynomenoid/ dalbergioid. Lotus and Medicago are equally closely related to the bean and equally distantly related to Arachis (Doyle and Luckow 2003). Also the agronomical and genome characteristics of the legumes in our study differ. Both of the model legumes are herbaceous plants of limited agricultural use with relatively small genomes of ~470 Mb, while the common bean and cultivated peanut are major grain legumes with larger genomes of 588 Mbp and 2813 Mbp, respectively (http://data.kew.org/cvalues/homepage.html). In the bean there are >29,000 domesticated and 1300 wild accessions in germplasm banks (Broughton et al. 2003). However, the genetic base of the commercial cultivars of specific market classes is narrow. Less than 5% of the genetic diversity available has been used globally despite nearly a century of organized bean improvement (Broughton et al. 2003). Several genetic maps representing different populations have been established on a backbone of RFLP markers (Vallejos et al. 1992; Nodari et al. 1993; Freyre et al. 1998).

The cultivated peanut is an allotetraploid with an AABB genome complement. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Legume Anchor Markers Link Syntenic Regions between Phaseolus Vulgaris, Lotus Japonicus, Medicago Truncatula and Arachis
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.