Murray Barnson Emeneau

By Bright, William | Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, March 2008 | Go to article overview

Murray Barnson Emeneau


Bright, William, Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society


28 FEBRUARY 1904 * 29 AUGUST 2005

BIOGRAPHICAL MEMOIRS

BORN IN LUNENBURG, Nova Scotia, Emeneau had an unusually long and productive career as professor of Sanskrit and linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley, where he was a founder of the linguistics department and of the Survey of California Indian Languages; he was elected to the APS in 1952. He died peacefully at his home in Berkeley on 29 August 2005, aged 101. In his later years, he was often asked whether he owed his longevity to any particular regimen of life; he always answered, "No, just genes." In fact, medical researchers have discovered in recent years that Emeneau's hometown of Lunenburg produces the highest percentage of centenarians in North America.

Emeneau was first trained in classics at Dalhousie University, Halifax, and at Oxford University. In 1926 he began the study of Sanskrit and comparative Indo-European at Yale, where he received his doctorate in 1931 with a dissertation on Sanskrit. From then until 1935, he did postdoctoral study at Yale under the direction of the leading anthropologist and linguist Edward Sapir. From him Emeneau eagerly absorbed not only the then-new "structural" linguistics, but also Sapir's distinctive approach to what was later called "anthropological linguistics." As he wrote in later years, "I was exposed to methods of fieldwork on non-literary languages, including intensive phonetic practice and analysis of material, but especially to Sapir's approach to anthropological linguistics, in which language is only part of the total culture, but a most important part, since in it the community expresses in its own way, 'verbifies' its culture."

With Sapir's help and guidance, and with grants from sources including the APS, Emeneau spent the years 1935-38 doing fieldwork on unwritten Dravidian languages of India, in particular on Toda. Back in the U.S., after teaching linguistics at Yale for a year, Emeneau was hired in 1940 as assistant professor of Sanskrit and general linguistics at Berkeley; he rose rapidly, becoming full professor by 1946, and later chair. He was a prolific interdisciplinary writer throughout his career, in areas ranging from Sanskrit philology to Dravidian linguistics to cultural anthropology, and he constantly urged his students to begin their own publication records. In 1971 he retired to emeritus status, but he continued his research, publication, and participation in academic activities well into his nineties. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Murray Barnson Emeneau
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.