Strange Times

Review - Institute of Public Affairs, September 2008 | Go to article overview

Strange Times


Fun for the whole family

New Russian laws are making it illegal to dress 'emo'-a subculture fashion inspired by hardcore punk, goth and indie music-following criticism that the emo culture encourages anti-social behavior and glorifies suicide. The new laws regulate emo culture websites and ban emo and gothic dress styles in schools and government buildings. Emo kids have gathered on mass to protest in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, with the support of their favourite bands and brandishing banners saying, 'a totalitarian state encourages stupidity.'

Monash council dumps late night trash cops

Melbourne residents have been woken in the early morning to find recycling inspectors rummaging through their garbage with head torches. Scoop Enterprises Pty Ltd has been contracted by many Melbourne councils to ensure prohibited items don't find their way into recycling bins. Monash City Council recently put an end to midnight inspections following a spate of complaints from frightened residents.

Put that hair back

Clyde Scott, a barber in Louisiana, was recently fined by police for breaching a 1966 Houma city ordinance prohibiting the barbershops from opening on Mondays. Clyde confessed ignorance of the 42 year old provision. District attorneys later dropped charges after media attention, stating that they have no record of the law ever being previously enforced. …

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