Six Folk Songs of the Americas

By Carman, Judith | Journal of Singing, September/October 2008 | Go to article overview

Six Folk Songs of the Americas


Carman, Judith, Journal of Singing


MABRY, GEORGE L., arr. (b. 1945). SIX FOLK SONGS OF THE AMERICAS. Medium high voice and piano. Roger Dean Publishing Company, 2002. Traditional keys/modes; B[musical flat]^sub 3^-G^sub 5^; Tess: M; regular meters; slow to moderate tempos; V/M, P/M; 38 pages. Medium high voice-mezzo soprano perhaps best.

4. "Come All Ye Fair and Tender Ladies." [duet] E[musical flat] major; B[musical flat]^sub 3^-G^sub 5^/B[musical flat]^sub 3^-D^sub 5^; Tess: mH/M; 4/4, Slowly and gently; V/M, P/M; 5 pages.

New settings of American folk songs are always welcome, as singers of all levels enjoy exploring new interpretations of old songs. George Mabry has chosen four familiar American folk songs, one Canadian folk song, and one unfamiliar South American (Brazilian) folk song for this collection. All of the arrangements are quite different from those currently available, with the exception of "He's Gone Away," the tune and harmonies of which are so familiar and well loved as to merit being kept close to what people expect to hear.

"The Riddle Song" is set quite simply in the first stanza with a melodic change only at the end. The second stanza takes the vocal line up a third, as though singing a harmony part, and the third stanza returns to the original melody, ending with a coda vocalized on "Ah." The piano part supports the voice throughout and also spins out a countermelody much of the time.

"Come All Ye Fair and Tender Ladies," based on a nineteenth century American ballad, has quite a different melody from other arrangements. In addition, the text is somewhat different and uses a third stanza not commonly found. Setting the ballad as a duet is a nice touch. It seems as if two girls-or two older women-are giving this advice to a group of other "fair and tender ladies." Perhaps the two have even been jilted by the same boy? In any case, they speak from experience.

"Lullaby to the Christ Child," translated from the Portuguese by Martha Williams and George L. Mabry, and in a minor key, is a lovely song in which the mother promises to keep the sleeping child safe though surrounded by the dark night. The melody is simple and haunting, and the piano part makes use of an opening motif in a descending pattern to create the mood. These notes are then spun out into other obbligato figures throughout the song.

"The Blackbird's Courting Song," marked "Playful, whimsical," is a clever setting of this jaunty song about birds seeking a mate. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Six Folk Songs of the Americas
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.