Keeping Democracy at Bay: Hong Kong and the Challenge of Chinese Political Reform

By Lim, Adelyn | The China Journal, July 2008 | Go to article overview

Keeping Democracy at Bay: Hong Kong and the Challenge of Chinese Political Reform


Lim, Adelyn, The China Journal


Keeping Democracy at Bay: Hong Kong and the Challenge of Chinese Political Reform, by Suzanne Pepper. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2008. x + 448 pp. US$85.00/£56.00/euro88.20 (hardcover), US$39.95/£26.00/euro40.95 (paperback).

The Sino-British Joint Declaration in 1984 on reversion of sovereignty over Hong Kong from the British government to the Chinese government on 1 July 1997 not only signified the transformation of Hong Kong from a British colony to a special administrative region of the People's Republic of China (PRC) but also changed the territory's internal and external political environment in the years preceding and following the political transition. Apprehension at the Chinese government's increasingly authoritarian stance with regard to political and social control has become one of the key concerns of the Hong Kong people. In particular, the government's agenda for the democratization of Hong Kong's political system has been a major crux of local demonstrations and protest actions. Moreover, in the past Hong Kong was part of the Western alliance, tolerated by the PRC only as a window of foreign information and technology and because of its contribution to the Chinese economy. Since its return to Chinese sovereignty, Hong Kong has found itself in the crossfire of Sino-US relations.

Suzanne Pepper offers a unique perspective of Hong Kong's political evolution from its founding as a British colony to its present as a special administration region, with a focus on the interplay between colonial, capitalist, Communist and democratic forces that shaped Hong Kong's political culture and institutions. The book is divided into three sections, which examine, respectively, colonial foundations, local reforms during British rule, and Chinese rule in Hong Kong. In the section on colonial foundations, Pepper considers the British government's long delay in introducing representative government in relation to the naissance of Hong Kong amidst the mid-19th-century Anglo-Chinese trade wars, continual Hong Kong Chinese dissent and traditional forms of Chinese "self-governance". In the section on local reforms during British rule, she discusses the reasons for the eventual initiation of representative government in Hong Kong during the 1992-97 tenure of its last British governor, Christopher Patten-the reasons being deeply rooted in Britain's own struggles for electoral reform-and the PRC's pursuit of various ideologies and its more recent reopening to Western capitalism. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Keeping Democracy at Bay: Hong Kong and the Challenge of Chinese Political Reform
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.