2008 Literacy Grant Recipients

Phi Kappa Phi Forum, January 1, 2008 | Go to article overview

2008 Literacy Grant Recipients


Young Students Inspired by Book Program

The Phi Kappa Phi Chapter at Lock Haven University brought all fourth grade students from a local elementary school to Borders book store to select books for their school's library. Kathy Richards, chapter president and literacy project director, chose her literacy project with one idea in mind: she wanted to encourage students at Jackson Elementary School to read more.

"I WORK IN THE ELEMENTARY EDUCATION DEPARTMENT of the University," she says. "I understand the importance of teaching the joy of reading to young children."

Richards says the results from her Literacy Award program were amazing and are having a lasting impact.

"You can't imagine what it's like to take 100 students of low socioeconomic status, many of whom have never been in a big book store, let alone been given money to spend on what they love, and see the joy on their faces," Richards said following the field trip. "In fact, I recently saw the librarian from Jackson Elementary School. She told me Our' books are getting a 'major workout' during summer school. She's thrilled!"

Richard says she also has seen a number of the fourth-graders who benefited from her literacy program over the summer as she's run errands. "When they see me they say, 'you're the lady who bought us books!'"

Not only did the students at Jackson Elementary Schools benefit from the program, Richard says. Her Phi Kappa Phi students also were touched.

"Another wonderful result of the Jackson Elementary project was the boost it gave to student teaching placements," she said. "The Phi Kappa Phi students who went had such an incredible experience, they asked to be placed at that school for student teaching.

"The fourth grade teachers agreed to the arrangement. It truly has been a wonderful experience for all of us."

More than 300 books were selected by the fourth graders and purchased using funds from Richards' Phi Kappa Phi Literacy Grant. Each book then was placed in the school's library with a Phi Kappa Phi book plate and the signature of the student who picked it. "There will always be a book in the library that has their name on it, giving them a piece of ownership in the library collection," Richards said.

Literacy Library for Leveled Reading

CATHERINE DELK (Austin, TX - initiated in Catneron University) Phi Kappa Phi funds will purchase 200 leveled reading books for an elementary school literacy library, Teachers and volunteers will use these books when teaching reading to beginning readers, below grade-level readers, and readers with learning disabilities in grades K-5. A commemorative book plate will be placed at the beginning of each book, recognizing Phi Kappa Phi for its donation. The local Phi Kappa Phi chapter will be invited to participate.

Tutoring Adult Learners

JUDY STILES (Missouri Southern State University) A combined effort with Joplin NALA (Neighborhood Adult Literacy Action) Read, a non-profit, tax-exempt literacy council, and MSSU will use members and resources of Phi Kappa Phi to foster and strengthen literacy skills in adult learners. It also will coordinate with community resources to provide services, enabling learners to reach their full potential. This will be accomplished by recruiting and tutoring adults who need help in reading, math, and/or English as a second language (ESL), recruiting volunteers, and training tutors. Students from Missouri Southern State University and Ozark Christian College will be recruited as volunteer tutors. In addition, the Director of Joplin NALA Read is a Phi Kappa Phi member and will assist the project Manager, Phi Kappa Phi member Judy Stiles of Missouri Southern State University, in overseeing the project. Resources from the grant will provide both literacy and ESL student books.

Building a Math in Literature Library

DONALD AUSTIN (Union College) The Studying Arithmetic In Literature (SAIL) program at Union College's Kenney Community Center for Education and Outreach works with two elementary schools in Schenectady, NY, to improve the math and reading literacy skills of 50 at-risk eiementary students. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

2008 Literacy Grant Recipients
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.