Falls Free Coalition Forges Action Plan

Aging Today, July/August 2008 | Go to article overview

Falls Free Coalition Forges Action Plan


The Falls Free Coalition (FFC) is a collection of national organizations, professional associations, federal agencies and state coalitions working to reduce the growing number of falls and fall-related injuries among older adults. Members recognize that effectively addressing this growing public health concern will require a collaborative effort of many individuals and organizations.

FFC was formed as a result of the first Falls Free Summit, held in December 2004. Summit participants forged and published the 51-page document Falls Free: Promoting a National Falls Prevention Action Plan, which represents the best ideas and practices of 58 organizations and experts in fall prevention from throughout the United States and Canada. In an effort to promote collaboration among FFC members and document their progress toward implementing the action plan's 36 strategies, the center maintains close contact with members, encourages the formation of partnerships among them and has developed an e-newsletter to keep all participants abreast of activities and the latest relevant research.

ADVOCACY WORKGROUP

When appropriate, FFC is prompting the development of coalition workgroups to address issues and strategies. For example, FFC helped develop the Advocacy Workgroup, which includes the National Council on Aging (NCOA), the Home Safety Council (HSC), the National Safety Council, AARP, the American Physical Therapy Association and the American Occupational Therapy Association. …

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