Building IQ

By Johnson, Emma | Journal of Property Management, May/June 2007 | Go to article overview

Building IQ


Johnson, Emma, Journal of Property Management


Intelligent buildings are becoming part of global real estate market

At one time, security cameras capturing an entire building's entrances on a single wall of monitors elicited "oohs and aahs." Today, a skyscraper's every system - including HVAC, signage, elevators, light and temperature control, and yes, even security - can be monitored on a single video wall by a single person.

Intelligent buildings are nothing new. Long embraced and now commonplace in new developments in Asia and the Middle East, these smart buildings with their high-tech networks and business systems are not just gee-wiz things of the future, experts say.

Rather, they are becoming an inevitable part of the global real estate market. Increased pressures on connectivity, energy efficiency and marketplace competition now force developers, leasing agents and real estate managers to consider investing in intelligent buildings to differentiate themselves - or even to stay in the game.

"People have been dying to learn about this technology, but they require return on investment proof before they begin," said Tom Shircliffl co-founder of Intelligent Buildings Group, a Charlotte, N.C.-based consultancy that creates ROI investment modeling for commercial properties. "As technology becomes more mainstream, advanced, and more common sense and obvious, people take it more seriously."

IT'S INTELLIGENT DESIGN, STUPID

While intelligent buildings are nothing new, neither is the confusion surrounding their ambiguous definition, said Paul Ehrlich, founder and president of Building Intelligence Group, a Minneapolis-based intelligent building consultancy.

"I'm not sure people know what intelligent buildings are," Ehrlich said. "It means many things to many people."

To some, intelligent buildings - also referred to as smart buildings or integrated buildings - are defined by energy efficient or environmentally friendly technologies. Others define them by way of high-tech tenant amenities like digital signage and directories, broadband and wireless services, and building automation. In the most basic sense, intelligent buildings require one or more of their systems to be automated and interconnected.

Ballantyne Village, in Charlotte, N.C., is one such building with an integrated system. The 800,000-square-foot mixed-use entertainment, retail and condominium property's HVAC systems, security, signage, lights and fountain controls are operated via a central location.

Ballantyne has sensors that monitor carbon dioxide, and as a result can count the number of people in a room and automatically adjust climate control. Dispensers for restroom soap, toilet paper and paper towels automatically communicate with facility managers when empty. Swiping an access pass opens doors for tenants, while concurrently turning on the lights and heating system.

Despite examples like Ballantyne Village, however, the lack of concrete parameters defining smart buildings has stunted their growth in the United States. Their value - as it relates to energy efficiency, tenant satisfaction, reduced labor and long-term cost savings - is misunderstood, Ehrlich said.

He said because the technology is largely untested in the states, convincing profitable U.S. developers, investors and real estate managers of its value is difficult. Converting to integrated building technology almost exclusively would require the re-education of nearly every level of the industry - from architects to developers to leasing agents and property managers.

Once builders become acquainted with smart building technology and see its potentially positive impact on their bottom line, Ehrlich said they will warm to integration.

"It's all about the investment on return. The returns on these investments are ridiculous - in the hundreds of percenti."

JUSTIFIABLY SMART

While U.S. developers are merely warming to smart buildings, places like Seoul, Tokyo, Singapore, Hong Kong and Dubai have moved full-speed ahead with integrating systems in their new developments. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Building IQ
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.