Articles on Mass Communication in U.S and Foreign Journals

By Ostman, Ronald E.; Jeffers, Dennis W. | Journalism Quarterly, Summer 1989 | Go to article overview

Articles on Mass Communication in U.S and Foreign Journals


Ostman, Ronald E., Jeffers, Dennis W., Journalism Quarterly


Articles on Mass Communication In U.S and Foreign Journals

A Selected Annotated Bibliography * January, February, March, 1989

Bibliographers: Mark J. Banks, Marquette; Stuart J. Bullion, Spring Hill; Dru Riley Evarts, Ohio; Alice Gagnard Kendrick, Southern Methodist; Susan J. Henry, California State-Northridge; John A. Lent, Temple; Tom Pasqua, Southwestern; Steve Pasternack, New Mexico State; John B. Webster, Purdue.

To help readers interested in articles with international aspects, entries have a letter after the number: A, Europe; B, USSR, Eastern Europe; C, Latin America, South America and Caribbean; D, Middle East; E, Africa; F, Asia, Australia and Pacific Islands; G, multi-area; H, Third World nations; K, Canada. Specific countries mentioned are listed following the International section.

KEY TO ABBREVIATIONS

Articles are chosen from trade, scholarly and general publications in the U.S. and abroad. Abbreviated: Advertising (Ad.); American (Am.); Broadcasting (Bdcstg.); Journal (J.); Marketing (Mktg.); Quarterly (Q.); Research (Res.); Review (Rev.); State (St.); Television (TV); University (Univ.). Journals: AJ, Am. Journalism; CJR, Columbia Journalism Rev.', CSMC, Critical Studies in Mass Communication; E&P, Editor & Publisher, HCR, Human Communication Res.; JE, Journalism Educator; JH, Journalism History; JOB, J. of Bdcstg. and Electronic Media: JOC, J. of Communication; JMME, J. of Mass Media Ethics; MCR, Mass Comm Rev.; NRJ, Newspaper Res. J.; POQ, Public Opinion Q.; PRJ, Public Relations J.; PRQ, Public Relations Q.; PRR, Public Relations Rev.; WSJ, Wall Street J.; WJR, Washington Journalism Rev.

Time Inc. was poised to merge with Warner Communications Inc. in a multi-billion dollar deal that would create the largest U.S. media/entertainment corporation (431). On a much smaller scale, but perhaps of major significance, Channel One piloted a news/commercial in-school vehicle that has critics fuming (271). The government put away,its AM license renewal rubber stamp for the first time since 1981, citing personnel and prize/promotional grounds for its denial (265). The Bush White House began its term of office with promises of access, spontaneity and openness, but press pros exuded skeptical sighs, saying "sounds similar to past presidential assurances" (404). Critics of The Christian Science Monitor continued to doubt the viability of management philosophy and staff changes (381, 432). Very little good was said about the Hazelwood decision, as academics and professionals continued to sift through the ashes of the scholastic press, torched by a restrictive Supreme Court ruling (337, 341, 347, 351, 384, 392). Legal emphasis was being placed less on dangers of libel and more on issues of access (280, 287, 317, 350). A new journal entered the field. Health Communication 1:1 weighed in at 73 pages (276).

Readers interested in helping to find and annotate these bibliographic references should contact either editor (c/o Department of Communication, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-5901 or Department of Journalism, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859).

Advertising

241. ALLEN, CHRIS and CHRIS JANISZEWSKI. Assessing the role of contingency awareness in attitudinal conditioning with implications for advertising research. J. of Mktg. Res. 26 pp30-43 Feb.-Results of experiments suggest TV commercials can be structured to affect contingency learning by using repeated presentation of brand followed by strong visual stimulus.

242. BOGART, LEO. Advertising: art, science, or business? J. of Ad. Res. 28:6 pp47+ Dec.Jan.-"Judgment is the art of advertising, not the science."

243. CASTRO, JANICE. is that you on tv, grandpa? Time p53 March 6-Ads feature aging b-boomers.

244. COLLINS, JULIA. Image and advertising. Harvard Business Rev. pp94-9 Jan.-Feb.-Review of great print ads from past anchors this piece about resurgence of print. …

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