Intersubjectivity: The Best Congenial Stock to Link the Western Thoughts with the Chinese Culture/INTERACTIVETE DE SUJET, CENTRE DE LA COMBINATION DES CULTURES ORIENTALES ET OCCIDENTALES

By Chunhui, Wang; Qiang, Zhao | Canadian Social Science, January 1, 2006 | Go to article overview

Intersubjectivity: The Best Congenial Stock to Link the Western Thoughts with the Chinese Culture/INTERACTIVETE DE SUJET, CENTRE DE LA COMBINATION DES CULTURES ORIENTALES ET OCCIDENTALES


Chunhui, Wang, Qiang, Zhao, Canadian Social Science


Abstract:

The theory of intersubjectivity is the development of the Western ideologies in modern times. It derives from subjectivity and it is the transcendence over subjectivity. Rather than as a theory of philosophy or aesthetics, it had been a concept and methodology infiltrating through the Chinese aesthetic practices, social concepts and culture. This thesis probes into the possibility of combining the Chinese culture and the Western thoughts by analyzing intersubjectivity embodied in the Chinese philosophy, social and political thoughts and the Chinese literary and art thoughts, thereby, proving that intersubjectivity is the best congenial stock to link the Western thoughts with the Chinese culture.

Keywords: Subjectivity, Intersubjectivity, Epistemology, the Moral Philosophy

Résumé: Théorie d'interactivité de sujet, le développement modern des idées de théorie d'interactivité de sujet, prend sa source dans la nature de sujet et la passe. En Chine, l'interactivité de sujet ne se pose pas comme une théorie dans les domaines de philosophie ou esthétique, mais elle s'est infiltrée dans les idées sociales et esthétiques chinoises. Cet article se présente l'interactivité à travers des idées de philosophique, société, politique et littérature chinoise, et il se présente la possibilité de la combinassions et la point de départ -interactivité de sujet.

Mots-clés: Subjectivité, intersubjectivité, epistemologie, la philosophie morale

1. INTRODUCTION

As Chinese culture has come into thorongh contact with the Western thought systems of the world, the two completely different ideological systems inevitably collide. During the processes of contact, it would sumly be a great loss to mankind at large if the acceptance of this new civilization should take the form of abrupt displacement instead of organic assimilation, thereby causing the disappearance of the Chinese traditional civilization. The real problem, therefore, may be restated thus: How can we best assimilate modem civilization in such a manner as to make it congemal and congruous and continuous with the civilization of our own makinS? How can we combine the two thought systems organically? What counts is to find a congenial stock with which we may organically link the thought systems of modern Europe and America, so that we may further build up our own ideological system on the new foundation of an internal assimilation of the Western thoughts. Intersubjectivity is the best congenial stock to link the Western thoughts with the Chinese culture.

There is a generally accepted idea that the Chinese culture and ideologies and the Western thought systems seem to be two parallel theories that will never meet together. As a result of it, the Chinese scholars have always ignored the Chinese traditional thoughts resources while introducing the Western ideologies. But in fact the most important contributions of modern ideologies in the Western world can all find their remote but highly developed precursors in those great Chinese schools of the fifth, fourth, and third centuries B.C. Intersubjectivity is a best case in point.

Intersubjectivity derives from subjectivity and it is the transcendence over subjectivity. Husserl firstly put forward intersubjectivity, followed by Heidegger, Sartre, Martin Buber and etc. They elaborated their views on intersubjectivity from different angles in succession. In a word, intersubjectivity holds a leading position in the modern Western ideological theories.

Although the theory of intersubjectivity is the development of the Western ideologies in modern times, the Chinese aesthetics and social concepts were originally intersubjective. However, in China there has never formed a perfect organic ideological system like that of the Western world. Rather than as a theory of philosophy or aesthetics, it had been a concept and methodology embodied in the aesthetic practice and social concepts and culture. …

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Intersubjectivity: The Best Congenial Stock to Link the Western Thoughts with the Chinese Culture/INTERACTIVETE DE SUJET, CENTRE DE LA COMBINATION DES CULTURES ORIENTALES ET OCCIDENTALES
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