On Piano Music XI Yang Xiao Gu and Chinese Culture/DE LA MUSIQUE DE PIANO XI YANG XIAO GU ET LA CULTURE CHINOISE

By Renge, Huang | Canadian Social Science, January 1, 2006 | Go to article overview

On Piano Music XI Yang Xiao Gu and Chinese Culture/DE LA MUSIQUE DE PIANO XI YANG XIAO GU ET LA CULTURE CHINOISE


Renge, Huang, Canadian Social Science


Abstract:

As the representative work of Chinese piano music, "Xi Yang Xiao Gu" has aroused a lot of research in musical world. This paper tries to study the relationship between this work and the traditional Chinese culture, so as to understand this work better.

Key words: "Xi Yang Xiao Gu" , Chinese piano music, Chinese traditional culture

Résumé: En tant qu'oeuvre représentative de la musique de piano chinoise, Xi Yang Xiao Gu a incité beaucoup de recherches dans le monde musical. Cet essai tente d'étudier les relations entre cette oeuvre et la culture traditionnelle chinoise pour permettre de mieux le comprendre.

Mots-Clés: Xi Yang Xiao Gu, musique de piano chinoise, culture traditionnelle chinoise

Among the free-expressioned Chinese piano works, those that are transformed and updated on basic of fine Chinese traditional music are miracles that carry the traditional style and national temperament. Therefore a great number of excellent adapted music emerged, such as "Xi Yang Xiao Gu", "Bai Niao Chao Feng" and "Mei Hua San Nong". Their distinct national features and high piano taste made them classical among Chinese piano music.

As the representative, "Xi Yang Xiao Gu" has aroused a lot of research in musical world.

"Xi Yang Xiao Gu", or named "Xun Yang Lute" or "Xun Yang Ye Yue", is originally a Chinese lute sole that expressed emotions. Its firstly appeared in a hand-written copy "Ju Shi Lin Lute Music Score" during Qing Dynasty (about 1736 to 1820). It totally had seven paragraphs without title. However, in Chen Zijing's copy there are seven titles: "Hui Feng", "Que Yue", "Lin Shui", "Deng Shan", "Xiao Rang", "Wan Tiao" and "Gui Zhou". In 1895, in"Thirteen Lute Music of Both North and South" ("Li Fangyuan Lute Music"), which wrote by lute player Li Fangyuan of Ping Hu School, the original seven paragraphs has been extended to ten in the name of Yu Nan Shi in Tang Dynasty. They are "Xi Yang Xiao Gu", "Hua Rui San Hui Feng", "Guan Shan Lin Que Yue", "Lin Shui Xie Yang", "Feng Di Qiu Sheng", "Wu Xia Qian Xun", "Xiao Sheng Hong Shu Li", "Lin Jiang Wan Tiao", "Yu Zhou Wan Chang" and "Xi Yang Ying Li Yi Gui Zhou". According to his edition, Wang Yuting reformed changed it to "Xun Yang Lute" or "Xun Yang Song", and those small titles are the same as Li Fangyuan's. Then it was published by Li Yansong. In 1920s, Zhen Jinwen and Liu Raozhang who were members of Shanghai famous amateur music group Da Tong Association adapted it to an instrument ensemble named "Chun Jiang Hua Yue Ye" lead by lute. And there were also ten small titles: "Jiang Lou Zhong Gu", "Yue Shang Dong Shan", "Feng Hui Qu Shui", "Hua Ying Ceng Tai", "Shui Yun Shen Ji", "Yu Ge Wan Chang", "Hui Lan Pai An", "Rao Ming Yuan Lai", "Ai Nai Gui Zhou" and "The End". Since then, this music, no matter played by lute alone, or in ensemble, all used the name "Chun Jiang Hua Yue Ye".

Though its name was given by Zhen Jinwen and Liu Raozhang, its lyric was written by Emperor Chen Shu-pao, and its music was composed by the Tai Chang musical officials. "Chun Jiang" has a long history that it is the short form of Chun Shen River. In Warring States Period, a Sir Chun Shen named Huang Xie has changed Huang Pu River to Chun Shen River or Chun River. Zhen Jinwen and Liu Raozhang all used to live beside the river, so they used "Chun Jiang Hua Yue Ye" since they had deep feelings toward it. The reason they named it was explained in A General Introduction to National Music, "Perhaps its name was given according to their imagination. It can't help reminding us poet Zhang Xuruo's Chun Jiang Hua Yue Ye, which was praised by Wen Yiduo as 'Poem of the poems, top above the top. '"

"Chun Jiang Hua Yue Ye" was the name of "Classical Chinese Poems in Qing and Shang Dynasty, Music of Wu Ge", which was said to be created by Emperor Chen Shu-pao for his maids and ministers to sing, or by Emperor Sui Yang. It was a very florid palace poem. …

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