Honored New York Project Screens Elders for Depression

Aging Today, September/October 2008 | Go to article overview

Honored New York Project Screens Elders for Depression


Although the majority of older adults are able to weather life's stressors adequately and maintain sound mental health, about 20% of people age 60 or older experience mental disorders that are not normal to aging. Yet seniors "underutilize mental health services more than any other age group," stated Christopher Miller of the New York City Department for the Aging (DFTA).

Miller manages the Geriatric Depression Education, Screening and Referral Initiative, which won an American Society on Aging 2008 Healthcare and Aging Award, presented by ASA's Healthcare and Aging Network in collaboration "with Pfizer Medical Humanities Initiative.

SENIOR CENTERS

Working through senior centers, the New York City initiative educates older adults about depression, screens their risk for clinical depression and refers atrisk elders for further evaluation and treatment. In addition, it provides inhome screening and referral to homebound clients.

Begun in 2005, the initiative focuses on New York City's minority and highpoverty communities, as well as on homebound clients registered with case management agencies. Through culturally and linguistic-appropriate activities, the initiative is designed to address misconceptions, stigma, lack of knowledge and attitudinal barriers to depression intervention and treatment, Miller explained.

The project trains senior center staff to increase their understanding of clini- cal depression and enlists their aid in urging center participants who appear to be at risk for depression to participate in project activities. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Honored New York Project Screens Elders for Depression
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.