Newslines


ICBA Hot Ticket at Political Conventions

While the votes for the upcoming presidential election have yet to be cast, the verdict is in on ICBA's lobbying outreach at the Democratic and Republican national conventions-it's a success!

Joining forces with five other member organizations of the Home- ownership Alliance, ICBA hosted celebrations in Boston and New York this summer for members of the Senate and House of Representatives who support national housing and housing finance issues. At conventions marked by scores of events, ICBA's gatherings were one of the hottest tickets in town, attracting more than 1,600 guests including senators, congressmen, governors and candidates, among others.

In New York, guests interacted with lobbyists at Rockefeller Center, while in Boston they took in views of historic Boston Harbor. With homeownership-focused themes like "Welcome Home" and "The Key to the Future," ICBA addressed community bank contributions to the American dream of homeownership while discussing the regulatory burden that limits the ability to focus on community needs.

"Community banks are proud of the role they play in making the American dream of homeownership a reality for millions of Americans," said Camden R. Fine, president and CEO of ICBA. "ICBA, together with our co-sponsoring organizations, is proud to be a part of highlighting this message to the. lawmakers. We are thrilled at the attendance at our events and the very positive response we received from numerous members of Congress."

Among the notables in Boston were Sens. Paul Sarbanes (Md.), Jack Reed (R.I.), Bill Nelson (FIa.), Ron Wyden (Ore.), Kent Conrad (N. D.) and Tom Carper (Del.) and television host Greta Van Susteren. In New York, Sens. Bob Bennett (Utah), Jim Talent (Mo.), and Ted Stevens (Alaska), Reps. George Nethercutt (Wash.), Tim Murphy (Pa.), and Randy Neugebauer (Texas) and political pundit Charlie Cook made appearances.

Rewarding Trust with Loyalty

In the wake of recent corporate accounting scandals, most employees (70 percent) still believe their organization's leadership is extremely or moderately trustworthy, according to a poll released by the Wall Street Journal.

Only 11 percent of employees feel that their organization's leadership is not at all trustworthy, while 20 percent of employees rate their leaders as "mildly trustworthy."

"The best places to work create loyalty among employees," says Tony Lee, editor of the Wall Street Journal's Career Journal.

As hiring demand continues to improve, it's even more important for top company executives to maintain employee loyalty by demonstrating that they can be trusted to lead their companies through this period of new growth."

Savings for a Rainy Day

The U.S. Mint estimates $7 bil- lion in coins are effectively out of circulation because they are stored in coin jars and bu- reau drawers in people's homes. A company that makes coin counting machines estimates the average household has a stash of coins between $30 and $50.

National Community Bank Service Award Entries Sought

Do you want to shine the spotlight on your employees' community service efforts? Is your bank engaged in an outstanding community service project? Then ICBA wants to hear from you. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Newslines
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.