North American Adult Educators: Phyllis M Cunningham Archive of Quintessential Autobiographies for the Twenty-First Century

By Miller, Kelsee | Journal of Adult Education, January 1, 2008 | Go to article overview

North American Adult Educators: Phyllis M Cunningham Archive of Quintessential Autobiographies for the Twenty-First Century


Miller, Kelsee, Journal of Adult Education


Armstrong, K. B., Nabb, L. W., & Czech, A. P. (Eds.). (2007). North American adult educators: Phyllis M Cunningham archive of quintessential autobiographies for the Twenty-First Century. Chicago: Discovery Association Publishing House. 307 pages.

As an adult educator, are you sick of reading reports with numbers that do not paint a true picture of your program? Are you frustrated with the limitations that affect how you can design an adult program? Then you need a break and a quick read that will inspire you to create an innovative and useful change! Professionals working with adults, whether in the field of education, social work, or even the justice system, will find the book North American Adult Educators: Phyllis M Cunningham Archive of Quintessential Autobiographies for the Twenty-First Century to be truly motivational. This book is a compilation of various educators' stories of their lives and careers in adult education. Many professionals in this field will recognize names (Michael Day or Ralph Brockett) and may even have the honor of knowing some of these wonderful educators. The book is dedicated to Phyllis M. Cunningham and her experience in the adult education field.

In Roots, Cunningham's autobiography, she provides a great introduction to her adult life by explaining her family's beliefs and values. This had a tremendous impact on her in that she knew who she was and where she came from. Her family instilled values to include equality for all. Cunningham states, "Our family may have been economically poor but we were culturally rich" (p. 2). What a profound statement to realize about one's upbringing. This knowledge provided her with such empathy that it is fitting she became an adult educator.

Most of these educators come from very humble beginnings, some were more humble than others, but all have had to make choices and sacrifices to reach their end goal. In speaking of their upbringings, they share that the cycle of values and beliefs starts in the home with one's family. This also has an impact on the value of education and one's determination to seek higher education when the barriers make the mission seem impossible.

Ralph Brockett not only speaks of his personal journey but also of his view of the adult education field and its modern history. His honesty in the examination of the adult education field in recent years is insightful as he provides hope for the future of adult education while instilling the basic belief that adult educators are to help learners reach their full potential. His insight may stir professionals to analyze their role in the bigger scheme of education.

Social workers may relate to Ms. Carusetta's autobiography while adult educators may relate to her words. She feels it is a daily struggle to find integrity in helping adult learners pursue their educational goals while dealing with everyday life battles and answering to the limitations of the adult education system. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

North American Adult Educators: Phyllis M Cunningham Archive of Quintessential Autobiographies for the Twenty-First Century
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.