Human Rights and Social Justice: Social Action and Service for the Helping and Health Professions

By Hawthorne, Dawn Msn, Ccrn | Journal of Cultural Diversity, Winter 2008 | Go to article overview

Human Rights and Social Justice: Social Action and Service for the Helping and Health Professions


Hawthorne, Dawn Msn, Ccrn, Journal of Cultural Diversity


DAWN HAWTHORNE, MSN, CCRN BOOK REVIEW HUMAN RIGHTS AND SOCIAL JUSTICE: SOCIAL ACTION AND SERVICE FOR THE HELPING AND HEALTH PROFESSIONS Wronka, J.M. (2008). Human Rights and Social Justice: Social Action and Service for the Helping and Health Professions. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. (ISBN: 978-1-4129-3873-0, paperback, $36.50, 335 pages, Annotated Media Resources section and Appendix A and B)

Joseph Wronka's book on human rights and social justice uses the 1948 United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights as the foundation globally raise the reader's level of social consciousness in an attempt to create a socially just world. In E art I of the book, Wronka introduces readers to the ey principles that are identified as the foundation of human rights. Expanding on these principles, the author states specific practices that must be adopted and adhered to universally if an equitable society is to exist. The author stipulates specific factors that are considered important and encourages each country to implement and mandate the principles of human rights into their constitution as well as legislative and judicial systems if a just society is to be achieved. These key principles include the right of every human being to be treated dignity; the end of discriminatory practices that are based on race, ethnicity and religion; freedom of expression; the provision of meaningful work and the payment of a living wage for all citizens; the provision of social and economic security throughout life; and performing civic duties to our neighbors. To obtain a deeper understanding of the concepts pertaining to human rights, the author introduces the principles of a humanistic philosophy and the necessity for social activists to be commitment toward nonviolence. Wronka also discusses the importance of a person's spiritual belief system, value system, and moral codes and their relationship to social justice. For people who are engaged in the helping and health professions (e.g., social workers, nurses, physicians, and government officials), this book provides valuable insight into the rational for embracing and adopting human rights principles and social action into their personal and professional lives.

The introduction and Chapter 1 of the book examine the core concepts of the Universal Declaration of human rights, which Wronka refers to as "customary international law by which all governments must abide" (p. 1). Based on the premise that when citizens have strong historical foundation atrocities of the past should not be repeated, Wronka uses a historical perspective to eloquently demonstrate the horrific consequences when governments nationwide disregard human rights and the deleterious impact of these actions on citizens. To prevent these occurrences of the past and to create a socially just world, the author introduces the concept of the creation of a culture that embraces human rights. Detailed descriptions of how each person and all countries can create and advocate for a culture that embraces human rights was powerfully addressed. Wronka further engages the reader by describing the controversities and struggles that are involved in creating this culture of human rights and social justice. These include the hypocrisy of the governments, the doctrine of humanitarian interventions, the oppression of cultural relativity, and the inadequacies of the for-profit system.

In Chapter 2, the historical discussion continues with the examination of human rights and social justice from a philosophic humanistic perspective. Cited are the theories of philosophers such as Sarte, Heidegger, and Maslow who postulated the importance of individuality and the valuing the uniqueness of each human being. To create a socially fair society, the fundamental principle of humanism, according to Wronka, must be used by society and its citizens to combat prejudices and discriminatory practices. Wronka points out succinctly the danger of labeling people (e. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Human Rights and Social Justice: Social Action and Service for the Helping and Health Professions
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.