A Man and a Month

By Henderson, Michael | The Spectator, August 31, 2002 | Go to article overview

A Man and a Month


Henderson, Michael, The Spectator


BOOKS written by sportsmen about their careers are usually, in the words of Brian Glanville, that brilliant chronicler of football, no more than `disingenuous ghosted pap'. You could never accuse Brian of writing pap. He was fearless in his denunciation of the second-rate but, at the same time, he celebrated all that was worth celebrating. And he knew what he was talking about, too, which helps.

As it happens, one prominent sportsman has recently brought out a book about his career, and another is about to. Roy Keane, the Manchester United midfielder, entrusted the writing of his autobiography to Eamonn Dunphy, who, like Keane, used to play for the Irish team. Dunphy has a reputation for swimming against the tide and, in that respect, Keane chose the right man. The book's revelations have been splashed all over the back pages and Keane is richer, though not wiser. His confession that he deliberately sought revenge on an opponent, Alf-Inge Haaland, may yet bring civil and possibly criminal charges.

The other sportsman is a different man altogether. Michael Atherton's father was on Manchester United's books as a young man before he went into teaching, but Atherton jnr played cricket for a living after leaving Cambridge in 1989 with a 2:1 in history. `Revenge is not a word I understand,' he says of Keane's confessions. What a withering dismissal that is. It amounts to telling Keane: `Oh do grow up, you silly little boy.'

Sadly, football attracts lots of silly boys. One of them, a journalist called Mick Dennis, is barely out of short trousers, it seems. Referring to Atherton's book, he wrote that it was tamer than Keane's, `like the game he plays'. Oh I don't know, lad. Atherton played 115 Test matches, captaining England in 54 of them. He opened the innings and took on the fastest, most intimidating bowlers in the world without complaint, even though he spent ten years combating a chronic back injury that often left him immobile and eventually ended his career at the comparatively young age of 33. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Man and a Month
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.