From the Editor

By Michelson, Stuart | Financial Services Review, Winter 2008 | Go to article overview

From the Editor


Michelson, Stuart, Financial Services Review


1. Introduction

This issue completes Volume 17 of Financial Services Review (FSR). For this volume, I accepted 12 articles out of 65 submissions and Conrad completed resubmissions of five articles from 2007. This results in an acceptance rate of 18% for articles submitted in 2008. These acceptances cover a wide range of financial planning topics, which become increasingly difficult to categorize. Of course 17(2) was our sponsored issue which provided an interesting viewpoint on individual financial planning. Many investment and retirement planning articles in FSR, also involve significant tax planning issues. The Journal also accepts a number of articles that involve some aspect of individual financial analysis, such as planning for retirement needs or planning practice, which cut across functional areas. I encourage authors to reach out when discussing implications of their findings in a more comprehensive way. As such, all articles in the Journal will more appropriately relate to financial planning issues.

The lead article by Johnson, Lange, and Newman, all of Auburn University Montgomery, explores interest rates and terms on deposit offerings from banks and thrifts. They control for risk, service, and demographics and find that less than perfect market efficiency exists to the extent that institutions paying lower interest rates still obtain deposits. They conclude that depositors may improve returns and receive other benefits by carefully comparing rates.

The second article by Crain and Ayres, both of the University of Oklahoma, investigate whether expected tax savings are greater for individuals who pretax or post-tax disability income insurance premiums. They find that younger individuals with lower incomes achieve a reduction in expected taxes if they pretax the disability income insurance premiums, while older individuals with higher incomes often achieve a reduction in expected taxes when they pay for disability insurance premiums with post- tax dollars.

The third article by Finke of Texas Tech University explores preferences for privatization of social security. Two-thirds of his sample would choose partial privatization. An average of 43% of his sample would be invested in equities, but 35% would be invested in government bonds. Men are more likely to prefer equities, while women prefer corporate bonds and Blacks, the less educated, and respondents with children preferred government bonds. …

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