A Brief View of the American Midland Naturalist since 1990

By McIntosh, Robert P. | The American Midland Naturalist, January 2009 | Go to article overview

A Brief View of the American Midland Naturalist since 1990


McIntosh, Robert P., The American Midland Naturalist


When I began my association with The American Midland Naturalist in 1959 as a member of the Executive Committee I had no thought of compiling its indices from 1959 to 1978 (Carpenter and Mcintosh 1978), or writing its Life History from its inception in 1909 to 1990 (Mcintosh, 1990) in its 82nd year of publication, and even less of continuing a brief comment on aspects of its recent history in a publication now marking its Centennial in 2009. I appreciate the courtesy of its latest, and soon to retire, editor, Dr. William Evans for inviting my reflections on its recent years. In the century of its publication the journal outgrew its name The American Midland Naturalist and description as devoted to natural history, particularly that of the prairie states, and became a national publication on diverse aspects of biology, and since 2005 is appropriately described on its cover as an International Journal of Ecology, Evolution and Environment. Even that wide-ranging description does not encompass its total breadth.

In the last two decades its cover has changed from traditional grey, covered with print to tan decorated with a green fern leaf and a green mosquito suggestive of the breadth of taxa included in its pages. In keeping with the times its cost will increase from $50 in the Americas in 1990 to $95 in 2009. It has also added new categories of subscribers-$55 for individuals and $35 for students in 2009. Since 1990 the number of subscribers has varied form 968 to 1167, averaging slightly over 1000. In that interval page charges also increased from $35 to $50 per page. It also changed in other ways. As editor in 1990 I would never have thought of the recent request that the author send a computer disk with the initial copy and another with the accepted copy. I was fortunate in having, for many years, the technical skills of Juanita Thomas as secretary and Charles McCollester as assistant editor. Juanita had antedated me as secretary, a position she held for 41 y. She retired in 1998 and was succeeded by Kimmarie Merz-Bogold who continued until 2008. Between them they made the editor's job tenable.

The change in the breadth of coverage in the journal is evident in the increase in number of Associate Editors from 15 in 1990, with no duplication, to 19 in 2008, two each in Ornithology, and Herpetology and three in Mammalogy. Plant Population Ecology was expanded to Vegetation Ecology. Limnology and Hydrobiology became Aquatic Ecology and Conservation appeared. As might be expected, associate editors served for various intervals very helpfully, but Harald E. Esch was unique in continuing as Associate Editor for Animal Behavior, a post he had held for sometime even before 1990. Versatility was evident in Carl Von Ende who was Associate Editor for Limnology and Hydrobiology in 1995 and for Biological Statistics in 2007.

The Executive Committee of the journal expanded from five to seven members, three of them having served 10 y: Ronald A. Hellenthal, David M. Lodge and Richard J. Jensen. The Executive Committee provided invaluable guidance to the editors in developing the policies of the journal. The journal celebrated the Sesquicentennial of Notre Dame University with special issues of Volume 126 in 1991 and Volume 127 in 1992.

The authors appearing in the journal are myriad and it would be impossible for me to identify individuals. The number of authors per year varied from 120 in 1992 to 189 in 1996. There was no trend to increase in number, but there was an increase in the number and proportion of women authors. Subject to the limitations of my ability to categorically identify women's names, women authors increased numerically and as a percent of male authors. (Table 1) Given the recent increases in women in universities and in graduate programs this trend may continue in coming decades.

Changes in emphasis in subject matter are evident in the categories of articles published in the period from 1990 to 2008. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Brief View of the American Midland Naturalist since 1990
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.