A Party That Cooks

By Slafkosky, Jenny | Sunset, February 2009 | Go to article overview

A Party That Cooks


Slafkosky, Jenny, Sunset


Make preparing dinner the party in itself. Invite your friends to chop, slice, and sauté-then feast

"TO THE SOUS-CHEFS!" says Joanna Dawson, raising her glass to a group of five friends. Glasses clink, and coach and friend Dan Petrie gets dinner rolling. A chef and owner of Mise en Place SF, a San Francisco-based cooking-party business, Petrie is teaching them how to create restaurant-worthy food together. As they bond over its preparation, dinner becomes entertainment and the meal rolled into one.

It's an idea that's easy to pull off in your own kitchen. So forget that expensive night out on the town. Using Petrie's tips, here's how to make a party out of cooking.

STAGING YOUR OWN COOKING BASH

PICK A MENU THAT BROADENS GUESTS'

CULINARY HORIZONS For the party shown here, Mise en Place SF's Dan Petrie chose modern Moroccan, starting with traditional spice blends such as ras el hanout and harissa and adding seasonal, accessible ingredients.

THINK "INTERACTIVE" For themes beyond Moroccan, Petrie suggests menus like Spanish tapas (lots of little dishes to make and try) or grill-your-own Korean barbecue.

TELL GUESTS IN ADVANCE what the menu is, and that they'll be cooking it.

KEEP THE RECIPES EASY Everyone should be able to participate and learn something new, no matter what their skill level.

KEEP THE SIZE MANAGEABLE Six to eight guests is ideal - enough to share the work but not overtake the space.

DIVVY UP DUTIES by interests or skills.

BE PREPARED Before guests arrive, assemble unprepped ingredients by recipe, along with all the equipment you'll need.

PACE THE PARTY Plan on no more than three hours for visiting and cooking - much longer and attention wanes. Start with a recipe that can be made ahead (such as cookies for this party), then move on to an appetizer so guests have something to nibble. Work on dishes like meatballs that can be partially completed, then finish up with last-minute cooking and plating of the meal.

HAVE FUN WITH WINE PAIRINGS For this menu, Petrie's suggestions are noted with recipes. For other menus, Sunset wine editor Sara Schneider recommends Perfect Pairings (University of California Press, 2006; $30) by Evan Goldstein. Once you've zeroed in on a flavor profile, you can ask guests to bring bottles that fit.

INFO miseenplacesf.com or 415/216-6682

Chèvre with pistachios and honey

SERVES 6 TIME 20 minutes

What a crowd-pleaser: This combination of warm, tangy cheese, aromatic honey, and salty nuts is ridiculously delicious and addictive. Even better, the dish takes just a few minutes to make.

WINE PAIRING Foxen Chenin Blanc 2007 (Santa Maria Valley; $20)

11 to 12 oz. fresh chèvre (goat cheese), at room temperature

2 tbsp. half-and-half

3 tbsp. orange blossom honey

1/3 cup coarsely chopped salted roasted pistachios

Sesame crackers or flatbread

1. Preheat oven to 350°. In a bowl, whisk goat cheese and half-and-half until smooth. Spoon into a small, shallow gratin dish, spreading level. Bake until cheese is hot in center and beginning to firm up at edges, about 15 minutes.

2. Drizzle cheese with honey and sprinkle with pistachios. Serve with crackers.

PER SERVING 233 CAL., 66% (153 CAL.) FROM FAT; 9.3 G PROTEIN; 17 G FAT (8.5 G SAT.); 13 G CARBO (0 G FIBER); 263 MG SODIUM; 50 MG CHOL.

Warm chickpea, red pepper, and spinach salad with harissa

SERVES 6 TIME 1 hour

To create this bright-tasting but sultry salad, Petrie starts with classic Moroccan roasted vegetables and then adds fresh spinach and a sherry vinaigrette.

Vinaigrette

1 tbsp. sherry vinegar

½ tbsp. Dijon mustard

¼ tsp. each kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 to 4 tsp. harissa*

3 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil

Salad

1 each medium red and yellow bell pepper

2 tbsp. olive oil

1 medium eggplant, cut into Vi-in. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

A Party That Cooks
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.