Predicting Behavior Problems and Social Competence in Children of Adolescent Mothers

By Hubbs-Tait, Laura; Osofsky, Joy D. et al. | Family Relations, October 1994 | Go to article overview

Predicting Behavior Problems and Social Competence in Children of Adolescent Mothers


Hubbs-Tait, Laura, Osofsky, Joy D., Hann, Della M., Culp, Anne McDonald, Family Relations


Although research on the consequences of adolescent parenting for the children of adolescent mothers has focused on these children's increased risk for maladaptive outcomes (see reviews in Brooks-Gunn & Furstenberg, 1986; Furstenberg, Brooks-Gunn, & Chase-Lansdale, 1989; Osofsky, Hann, & Peebles, 1993), not all children of adolescent mothers suffer negative consequences. In the extensive 17-year study of 296 children of adolescent mothers in Baltimore (Furstenberg, Brooks-Gunn, & Morgan, 1987), 53% did experience negative academic outcomes: They repeated at least one grade. However, 26% of the sample were above average in class standing; Furstenberg et al. (1987) documented that three changes in an adolescent mother's family life positively affected her child's academic status: terminating welfare status, contracting a stable marriage, and advancing her own education. Similar results were recently reported by Barratt (1991).

Although the academic performance of the Baltimore sample of children of adolescent mothers was strongly affected by mothers' economic, educational, and marital status, children's behavior problems were only influenced weakly by these same variables (Furstenberg et al., 1987). The absence of strong effects suggests that other family characteristics need to be examined as predictors of behavior problems in children of adolescent mothers.

One clear candidate for a predictor of the behavior problems of children of adolescent mothers is maternal parenting practices. Parenting practices were not examined in the original Baltimore study but have subsequently been found to contribute to infant behaviors (Field, Widmayer, Adler, & de Cubas, 1990) and have been proposed to be potentially important predictors of later outcomes as well (Furstenberg et al., 1989). However, this proposal has yet to be tested systematically. The continuing lack of longitudinal research on the impact of adolescent parenting practices on children after infancy has led to repeated requests for such research (Brooks-Gunn & Chase-Lansdale, in press; Chase-Lansdale, Brooks-Gunn, & Paikoff, 1991; Furstenberg et al., 1989; Roosa, 1991).

The current study is the first of a series of studies at sites in Kansas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma designed to remedy the lack of such longitudinal research on adolescent mothers and their children by investigating the relationship between parenting practices of adolescent mothers from infancy through early childhood and their preschool children's behavior problems and positive socioemotional outcomes. This series of studies is grounded in a new conceptual framework of adolescent parenting that modifies attachment theory's emphasis on the primary importance of the mother-child relationship in predicting later child outcomes (Bowlby, 1969, 1973, 1980; Ainsworth, Blehar, Waters, & Wall, 1978; Main, Kaplan, & Cassidy, 1985; Sroufe, 1979, 1989) by adding the adolescent mother's own continuing development to the prediction of her child's later behavior. Thus, the first purpose of the current study is to remedy the lack of longitudinal research on the impact of parenting practices of adolescent mothers on their children and the second purpose is to test the proposed model of adolescent parenting.

Attachment theory and research on attachment in adult mothers and their children emphasize the continuity from children's secure attachment in infancy to their social competence in childhood (Waters & Sroufe, 1983; Waters, Wippman, & Sroufe, 1979) and from children's insecure or disorganized attachment to their behavior problems in childhood (Greenberg, Speltz, Deklyen, & Endriga, 1991; Sroufe, 1989; Sroufe & Rutter, 1984). Some researchers argue that this continuity in children's adaptation may well be due to the stability of and low stress in the lives of their adult mothers (e.g., Lamb, 1987). Stability and low stress are not hallmarks of the lives of adolescent mothers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Predicting Behavior Problems and Social Competence in Children of Adolescent Mothers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.