Convergence of Information and Law: A Comparative Study between I-Schools and Other ALISE Schools

By Gathegi, John N; Burke, Darrell E | Journal of Education for Library and Information Science, Winter 2008 | Go to article overview

Convergence of Information and Law: A Comparative Study between I-Schools and Other ALISE Schools


Gathegi, John N, Burke, Darrell E, Journal of Education for Library and Information Science


This study examined the incorporation of law-related courses into information studies curricula. Data were gathered from the 59 member schools of the Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE) and 4 members of the i-School community, who are not ALISE members. Results indicated that schools are infusing law-related courses in their curricula, and that i-Schools seem to be early adopters in this regard, as compared to other ALISE schools.

Introduction

One of the characteristics defining the study of information is the increasing acquisition of diverse disciplines into our core scholarly approach. Indeed because information is important to just about any discipline, it is inevitable that the study of information and these other disciplines should become intrinsically intertwined.

Nowhere, perhaps, is this intertwining more pronounced than in the fields of law and information. The law itself is essentially made up of information. At the same time, the field of information is increasingly being impacted by legal developments. This impact is becoming so central to the field of information that at times it appears the field is in danger of being swallowed by the Jaw.1

One only has to look at a few examples to begin to get a sense of this changing environment: the increasing central ity of intellectual property rights, perhaps best symbolized by controversies in peer-to-peer file sharing, database licensing issues in libraries, privacy and censorship issues (e.g., the supreme court internet filters case), legal impacts of information technologies, and information liability issues, just to name a few. Add to this mix the impact of international legal action (e.g., the European Directives on the protection of databases and privacy protection, the work of the World Intellectual Property Organization, international treaties) and the environment becomes increasingly complex.

Robust programs in information schools2 have to provide their students with some solid grounding on these information law issues, before they graduate. This is especially so because intellectual property, security, and privacy issues are likely to take center stage in the field of information for a long time in the foreseeable future. Unfortunately, in our experience of teaching information policy, few of our students come to our programs with a good sense of, for example, intellectual property issues, and equally few, perhaps, are well exposed to such issues before their graduation from information studies programs.3

Conrad and Rapp-Henrietta have noted forces, both internal and external, that influence the education of information professionals.4 These include external factors such as technology and the marketplace, as well as internal ones such as the shifting nature of knowledge creation and academic reorganization).5 Obviously, schools have to respond appropriately to these factors, and indeed a whole conference was organized to address these external and internal factors.6 Schools change their curricula, for example, in response to external competency requirements.7 It is our contention that the convergence of law and information is such a factor, as it demonstrates the merger of external and internal factors, and that i-Schools are leading the way in trying to address this convergence.

Objective

In this paper we view the convergence of law and information as a major challenge in the information field, and we examine the ways in which educational programs are engaging this challenge in order to leverage the field's interdisciplinary strength. Thus, we explore curricula and faculty expertise to gauge the diffusion of law into information schools. We present some preliminary findings from a pilot research project surveying the response of information studies programs to the increasing centrality of law in information. Further, we analyze and compare the responses between i-Schools and other information institutions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Convergence of Information and Law: A Comparative Study between I-Schools and Other ALISE Schools
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.