DADS SALUTE Amazing Moms

Working Mother, February/March 2009 | Go to article overview

DADS SALUTE Amazing Moms


Barbara Wynston

SHE PAYS IT FORWARD

Perhaps once in a lifetime we get to meet someone who changes our whole world, as well as the life of everyone she meets. We find ourselves wondering how we ever survived without this person in our life - not for the things she does for us, not for the things she gives us, but for how she teaches and changes us so we become better people for having known her. My wife, Barbara, is one of those people.

Barbara was born and raised in New Jersey- cities, suburbs and shore, which provided a range of experiences that helped shape her into the most remarkable person IVe ever met. Now a vice president at Bank of America, Barbara is extremely successful in her career and caring for our four childrenDouglas, u; Remy, 10; Ashley, 7; and Landen, 6 - and our dog, Buttercup, a mixed breed that we adopted from a local shelter.

Barbara has a beautiful soul. Her belief in paying it forward is so strong that her commitment to doing good and helping others succeed is unyielding. Yet she doesn't do something to get something; she's kind and giving because seeing other people benefit from her support fills her heart. This is shown through her volunteering as a Girl Scout Leader, walking in the Avon Walk for Breast Cancer, teaching Sunday school, serving on her college sorority's international governing board and mentoring coworkers. Doing the right thing has made her the kindest, gentlest, most supportive person you'd ever hope to meet. After walking the Avon Walk in New York for two days and 39 miles in the rain and cold, she drew the greatest pleasure from seeing her children at the finish line not because they cheered for her, but because they would understand how important it is to support others and the joy it brings.

My wife is also the strongest person I've ever met. , Her perseverance when others might throw in the towel inspires me to always try my best. In difficult times, she's the person who will listen, support and do anything she can to help. I'm inspired to become a better person just being around her. -Michael Wynston

Peggy Campbell-Rush

AN UPBEAT SURVIVOR

My wife, Peggy, is the hardest-working mom IVe ever known. She impresses me every day with her talents, love for her family, work ethic and compassion.

By day, she's a nationally honored kindergarten teacher. After school, she coaches her school's cross-country track team. At night, after family dinner and spending time with our children, Mackensie, 22, Morgan, 20, and Taylor, 17, she writes: She's the author of six books on education. In the summer, she conducts educational workshops for teachers because she believes in giving back.

Peggy is also a breast cancer survivor. She was diagnosed in 1995, had a mastectomy and lost her breast, underwent chemotherapy, lost her hair, lost 25 pounds and almost lost her life. Peggy faced this challenging period with her usual resilience. She chose not to wear a wig but instead wore a baseball cap that read "No Hair Day" on the front. She now runs in the Komen New York City Race for the Cure every year and has placed fourth three times and third last year.

Even through cancer, Peggy has maintained her positive attitude. But her resolve would once again be tested when, in September 2006, a car shot out of oncoming traffic and hit her car head-on. Among other injuries, four inches of her sternum and both of her wrists were broken. She had to stay prone for a month and was out of work for three months, but as soon as she could, she started walking to rebuild her strength.

A world traveler, Peggy was chosen as a Fulbright Fellow in 2004 to travel to South Africa to study apartheid. But if you ask her, she'll tell you that her favorite place to be is home with the kids and me. . - Jim Rush

Aimee Evans

A (LONG) DAY IN HER LIFE

2:30 a.m. Sleep interrupted by unexplained thump! It must be our 4-year-old, Awstin, railing out of bed (again). …

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