Marketing Nation

By Tatu, Robin | ASEE Prism, March 2009 | Go to article overview

Marketing Nation


Tatu, Robin, ASEE Prism


MARKETING NATION America needs creative entrepreneurship, not more engineers, a businessschool professor argues. THE VENTURESOME ECONOMY: How Innovation Sustains Prosperity in a More Connected World by Amar Bhidé Princeton, 2008, 508 pages

At a time when both the National Academies and President Obama say America needs more research funding, engineers, and scientists. Amar Bhidé offers a very different assessment. U.S. market strengths derive from a complex interplay of forces, says this Columbia University professor. They rely not merely - or even primarily - upon high-level science but also upon creative product development, adaptation, and business strategies. Rather than presenting a threat, technological advances in India and China will support continued U.S. development, just as innovations from abroad have always done.

Arguing against those he terms "technonationalists," Bhidé presents a vision of an America that thrives through risk-taking and skillful marketing. To maintain a global lead, we should not simply pour money into more science but invest in a range of educational and business resources. Nor should we advance a narrow agenda of protectionism, he argues, but rather, embrace global competition as healthy and supportive of U.S. development. "High-level knowledge is now highly geographically mobile and is used to produce goods and services far from where it originates," writes Bhidé. Yet it is often mid-level innovators and not scientific or engineering experts who play a key role in turning such knowledge to profitable local use. The provocative arguments explored in The Venturesome Economy should provide engaging reading for ASEE members.

Bhidé bases his analysis upon a sixyear study of 106 U.S. venture-capital businesses. Such youthful enterprises are often more risk-taking and globally focused than established businesses, he writes; so it is through them that we can observe innovation at work. Book 1 of The Venturesome Economy, which details the results of this study, serves as the underpinnings for the larger considerations explored in Book 2, Some readers may find this latter section more intriguing, with its often contrarian positions. Bhidé argues, for example, that U.S. immigration policy should stop favoring technical Ph.D. immigrants over younger, less trained talent who can provide labor for !T departments, banks, and retailers. He also questions the findings of the National Academies' report Rising Abone the Gathering Storm, charging that it draws upon limited and outdated data.

The research into VC-backed businesses in Book 1 is also engaging, and it is this section that provides greater support for Bhide's assertions. Here he is able to demonstrate how successful businesses of- ten capitalize on the technical innovations of others, and how success is secured through the creative adaptation, repositioning, and marketing of services or products, rather than through the initial science. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Marketing Nation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.