Explanation of Statistical Data

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Explanation of Statistical Data


Instructional Faculty. The instructional faculty is defined as all those members of the instructional-research staff who are employed full time, regardless of whether they are formally designated "faculty." It includes all those whose major regular assignment (at least 50 percent) is instruction, including release time for research. Medical school faculty members are excluded from the tabulations. Faculty members on sabbatical leave are counted at their regular salaries even though they may be receiving a reduced salary while on leave. Replacements for those on leave with pay are not counted; replacements for those on leave without pay are counted. All faculty members who have contracts for the full academic year are included, regardless of whether their status is considered "permanent." Institutions are asked to exclude (a) instructional faculty members who are not employed on a full-time basis; (b) instructional faculty members whose services are valued by bookkeeping entries rather than by full cash transactions unless their salaries are determined by the same principles as those who do not donate their services; (c) instructional faculty members who are in military organizations and are paid on a different scale from civilian employees; (d) administrative officers with titles such as dean of instruction, academic dean, associate or assistant dean, librarian, registrar, coach, or the like, even though they may devote part of their time to classroom instruction; and (e) graduate or undergraduate students who assist in the instruction of courses, but who have titles such as teaching assistant, teaching associate, or teaching fellow.

Salary. This figure represents the contracted salary excluding summer teaching, stipends, extra load, or other forms of remuneration. Department heads with faculty rank and no other administrative title are reported at their instructional salary (that is, excluding administrative stipends). Where faculty members are given duties for eleven or twelve months, salary is converted to a standard academic-year basis by applying a factor of 9/11 (81.8 percent) or by the institution's own factor, reflected in a footnote to the appendix tables of this report.

Benefits. Benefit amounts tabulated here represent the institution (or state) contribution on behalf of the individual faculty member; the amount does not include the employee contribution. The major benefits include (a) retirement contribution, regardless of the plan's vesting provision; (b) medical insurance; (c) disability income protection; (d) tuition for faculty dependents (both waivers and remissions are included); (e) dental insurance; (0 social security (FICA); (g) unemployment insurance; (h) group life insurance; (i) workers' compensation premiums; and (j) other benefits in kind with cash alternatives (for the most part, these include benefits such as moving expenses, housing, cafeteria plans or cash options to certain benefits, bonuses, and the like). See also the footnote to tables 10A and 10B.

Compensation. Compensation represents salary plus institutional contribution to benefits. It is best viewed as an approximate "cost" figure for the institution, rather than an amount received by the faculty member.

Institutional Categories (revised for 2008-09)

Category I (Doctoral). Institutions characterized by a significant level and breadth of activity in doctoral-level education as measured by the number of doctorate recipients and the diversity in doctoral-level program offerings. Institutions in this category grant a minimum of thirty doctoral-level degrees annually, from at least three distinct programs. (First-professional degrees, such as the JD, MD, and DD, do not count as doctorates for this classification.)

Category IIA (Master's). Institutions characterized by diverse postbaccalaureate programs (including first professional) but not engaged in significant doctoral-level education. Institutions in this category grant a minimum of fifty postbaccalaureate degrees annually, from at least three distinct programs. …

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