Bring in the Noise


Check out some of the songs that tapper Germaine Salsberg likes best.

Germaine Salsberg lives to tap. In addition to being on faculty at Broadway Dance Center for over 20 years and teaching at STEPS on Broadway, she's worked with Tony Award-winner Danny Daniels on the Broadway and national tours of Tap Dance Kid and has privately coached actors, including Liza Minnelli on the film Steppin' Out. With a reputation for instilling a strong technical foundation through rhythm elements, it's no wonder she recently released a CD of music for tap class. Along with pianist Kevin Cole, the two created Tap Tunes: For Tap Class and Practice. "I feel it is my obligation to acquaint students with different styles of tap. Therefore, I utilize different types of music," says Salsberg. "Music choices need to be interesting enough to dance to, but not overwhelming."

Artist: Gene Krupa

Song/Album: "Hodge Podge," / Disk

"This is an oldie but goodie. It's really a big-band sound, but it's not so over-arranged that it takes over. It's not real fast, but it has the Gene Krupa drive. Good for style, time steps and combinations that could incorporate a musical theater or big-band style."

Artist: Jo Jones

Song/Album: "Jive at Five," The Everest Years

"I did some work with Sarah Petronio in Paris, who is so swinging. She introduced me to the music of Jo Jones, a jazz drummer from the '60s and '70s, and boy does he swing, too! I love other songs on this album as well, so check out the entire album. The music is good for combinations-it really forces the students to listen and syncopate."

Artist: Kenny Burrell

Song/Album: "Midnight Blue," Midnight Blue (The Rudy Van Gelder Edition Remastered)

"This is a medium swing that keeps a very even tempo, and it goes on long enough to do long exercises (shuffles, double shuffles and triplets) at a relaxed pace. …

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