The Effects of Size Changes on Haptic Object Recognition

By Craddock, Matt; Lawson, Rebecca | Attention, Perception and Psychophysics, May 2009 | Go to article overview

The Effects of Size Changes on Haptic Object Recognition


Craddock, Matt, Lawson, Rebecca, Attention, Perception and Psychophysics


Two experiments examined the effects of size changes on haptic object recognition. In Experiment 1, participants named one of three exemplars (a standard-size-and-shape, different-size, or different-shape exemplar) of 36 categories of real, familiar objects. They then performed an old/new recognition task on the basis of object identity for the standard exemplars of all 36 objects. Half of the participants performed both blocks visually; the other half performed both blocks haptically. The participants were able to efficiently name unusually sized objects haptically, consistent with previous findings of good recognition of small-scale models of stimuli (Lawson, in press). However, performance was impaired for both visual and haptic old/new recognition when objects changed size or shape between blocks. In Experiment 2, participants performed a short-term haptic shape-matching task using 3.D plastic models of familiar objects, and as in Experiment 1, a cost emerged for ignoring the irrelevant size change. Like its visual counterpart, haptic object recognition incurs a significant but modest cost for generalizing across size changes.

A central feature of human object recognition is the ability to recognize an object despite the wide variety of perceptual inputs that can be associated with it. Our visual system can cope with many disruptive transformations, such as changes in viewpoint, lighting, or color. We are also capable of visually recognizing objects despite variations in size (e.g., Jolicoeur, 1987; Uttl, Graf, & Siegenthaler, 2007). Two distinct aspects are involved in this capability. First is the ability to perceive physical rather than retinal size: A nearby object projects a larger retinal image than does an identically sized object that is farther away, yet we do not typically perceive the more distant object to be smaller. Thus, although retinal image size is a product of both the physical size of an object and its distance from the observer, we normally perceive an object's size to be close to its physical size. This ability is called size constancy. The second aspect is our ability to generalize recognition of objects across physical size changes; thus, we can recognize both a small and a large cup as cups. The latter ability, to generalize over physical rather than retinal size changes, is the focus of the present study. Specifically, we consider how the haptic and visual modalities compare in their abilities to generalize across physical size changes.

Visual Size-Change Effects

A considerable body of research has examined how size changes affect visual object recognition. Jolicoeur (1987) reported a size-change cost in old/new recognition with line drawings of familiar objects. Participants were shown either large or small pictures of objects at study; at subsequent test, half of the shapes were shown at the same size as at study, and half were shown at the other size. Recognition was slower and less accurate when objects changed size from study to test. Biederman and Cooper (1992; see also Fiser & Biederman, 1995) tested priming of naming and same/different matching of line drawings of familiar objects. In three experiments, participants saw these drawings twice; half were shown at the same size both times, and half were shown at different sizes. Size changes did not affect priming of naming but did impair same/different matching. Cooper, Schacter, Ballesteros, and Moore (1992) showed participants line drawings of structurally possible or impossible unfamiliar objects and found that size changes did not affect priming of structural possibility judgments, but did impair old/new recognition. Uttl et al. (2007) showed participants color photographs of common objects against a blank background; these photographs were scaled to give three different sizes of each object. Participants rated the familiarity of the objects in the photographs, and completed either a naming or an old/new recognition task immediately after the study phase and again 1 week later. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Effects of Size Changes on Haptic Object Recognition
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.