Eye of the Tiger

By Kaser, Dick | Information Today, May 2009 | Go to article overview

Eye of the Tiger


Kaser, Dick, Information Today


At ITI's Computers in Libraries conference in Washington, D.C., in March, someone ordered pizza for gaming night, and about a hundred librarians showed up to test-drive the interactive games on display.

The entire notion of gaming in libraries, while wildly advocated by some, remains controversial. If we were talking about the library hosting a spelling bee or a Sudoku bake -off, there would be few people who would think it out of sync with a library's character or social charge. It gets hairy when the games in question are played off a black box and have virtual aspects.

I don't want to get into the debate about whether such games draw in teens and young adults who may get a taste for other library services as a result. But in general, I don't think bait-and-switch tactics actually work.

But if we can agree that libraries are about exposing people to mediums of expression and to the artifacts of information discovery and creative endeavor, then we will have no trouble accepting interactive games as legitimate elements for public display at our libraries.

Of course, games are entertainment devices first and foremost. But some games are also knowledge containers with built-in messages about our cultural beliefs and social standards. Think about chess with its kings, queens, bishops, knights, and pawns. It's a game of strategy, but it's also a container of a cultural viewpoint, feudal as it might be. It's a game, but it's also a knowledge object.

Now think about Monopoly, the board game from Parker Bros., with a logo that makes little secret that the game is about a real estate tycoon before the Great Depression. The tycoon goes out buying and selling properties, collecting a buck at every turn, and goes bust once in a while, if not to jail. Does this remind you of any other times besides the 1930s? It's not just a game; it's a container for the lessons of the past (not that we ever learn not to repeat the errors).

Enter Guitar Hero World Tour, one of the Xb ox games featured at CILs gaming night. I also had the opportunity to test-drive this one in advance at my daughter's house. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Eye of the Tiger
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.